Phylogenetic status and matrilineal structure of the biting midge, Culicoides imicola, in Portugal, Rhodes and Israel

John F Dallas, R. H. Cruickshank, Y. M. Linton, Damien Nolan, M. Patakakis, Y. Braverman, R. Capela, M. Capela, I. Pena, R. Meiswinkel, M. D. Ortega, M. Baylis, Philip Mellor, Anne Jennifer Mordue

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Abstract

The biting midge Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the most important Old World vector of African horse sickness (AHS) and bluetongue (BT). Recent increases of BT incidence in the Mediterranean basin are attributed to its increased abundance and distribution. The phylogenetic status and genetic structure of C. imicola in this region are unknown, despite the importance of these aspects for BT epidemiology in the North American BT vector. In this study, analyses of partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI) sequences were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among 50 C. imicola from Portugal, Rhodes, Israel, and South Africa and four other species of the Imicola Complex from southern Africa, and to estimate levels of matrilineal subdivision in C. imicola between Portugal and Israel. Eleven haplotypes were detected in C. imicola, and these formed one well-supported clade in maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees implying that the C. imicola samples comprise one phylogenetic species. Molecular variance was distributed mainly between Portugal and Israel, with no haplotypes shared between these countries, suggesting that female-mediated gene flow at this scale has been either limited or non-existent. Our results provide phylogenetic evidence that C. imicola in the study areas are potentially competent AHS and BT vectors. The geographical structure of the C. imicola COI haplotypes was concordant with that of BT virus serotypes in recent BT outbreaks in the Mediterranean basin, suggesting that population subdivision in its vector can impose spatial constraints on BT virus transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-387
Number of pages8
JournalMedical and Veterinary Entomology
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

Keywords

  • Culicoides imicola
  • African horse sickness
  • Bluetongue
  • cytochrome oxidase I gene
  • mtDNA
  • Europe
  • Israel
  • Portugal
  • Rhodes
  • AFRICAN HORSE SICKNESS
  • BLUETONGUE-VIRUS
  • GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION
  • MITOCHONDRIAL VARIATION
  • BAYESIAN PHYLOGENETICS
  • POTENTIAL VECTORS
  • COMPLEX DIPTERA
  • SPECIES COMPLEX
  • CERATOPOGONIDAE
  • VARIIPENNIS

Cite this

Dallas, J. F., Cruickshank, R. H., Linton, Y. M., Nolan, D., Patakakis, M., Braverman, Y., ... Mordue, A. J. (2003). Phylogenetic status and matrilineal structure of the biting midge, Culicoides imicola, in Portugal, Rhodes and Israel. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 17(4), 379-387. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2915.2003.00454.x

Phylogenetic status and matrilineal structure of the biting midge, Culicoides imicola, in Portugal, Rhodes and Israel. / Dallas, John F; Cruickshank, R. H.; Linton, Y. M.; Nolan, Damien; Patakakis, M.; Braverman, Y.; Capela, R.; Capela, M.; Pena, I.; Meiswinkel, R.; Ortega, M. D.; Baylis, M.; Mellor, Philip; Mordue, Anne Jennifer.

In: Medical and Veterinary Entomology, Vol. 17, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 379-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dallas, JF, Cruickshank, RH, Linton, YM, Nolan, D, Patakakis, M, Braverman, Y, Capela, R, Capela, M, Pena, I, Meiswinkel, R, Ortega, MD, Baylis, M, Mellor, P & Mordue, AJ 2003, 'Phylogenetic status and matrilineal structure of the biting midge, Culicoides imicola, in Portugal, Rhodes and Israel', Medical and Veterinary Entomology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 379-387. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2915.2003.00454.x
Dallas, John F ; Cruickshank, R. H. ; Linton, Y. M. ; Nolan, Damien ; Patakakis, M. ; Braverman, Y. ; Capela, R. ; Capela, M. ; Pena, I. ; Meiswinkel, R. ; Ortega, M. D. ; Baylis, M. ; Mellor, Philip ; Mordue, Anne Jennifer. / Phylogenetic status and matrilineal structure of the biting midge, Culicoides imicola, in Portugal, Rhodes and Israel. In: Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 379-387.
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KW - VARIIPENNIS

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JO - Medical and Veterinary Entomology

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