Physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions supplemented with vegetable powders

Vasileios Raikos*, Madalina Neacsu, Philip Morrice, Garry Duthie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: The effect of vegetable powders on the physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions was studied. Vegetable powders (beetroot, broccoli, carrot, celery, green pea, red pepper, spinach, swede, tomato and yellow pea) were added at 2.5% (w/v) to emulsions prepared with rapeseed oil. The physical stability of the emulsions was characterised using the emulsifying activity (EAI) and the emulsifying stability indices (ESI) in addition to bright field microscopy. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was monitored by means of an accelerated oxidation test (Rancimat method). The addition of most vegetable powders did not markedly affect the physical stability of the emulsions although an adverse effect of tomato was observed. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was significantly improved in most cases as indicated by the Rancimat method with broccoli exhibiting the highest increase in induction time (98.2%) compared with the control. Both polar and nonpolar antioxidants are likely to contribute to the overall chemical stability of this complex food system in a concentration-dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2433-2440
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Food Science and Technology
Volume49
Issue number11
Early online date2 Jun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Egg Proteins
egg proteins
Vegetables
Emulsions
Powders
emulsions
powders
Oils
vegetables
Proteins
Water
Brassica
Peas
emulsifying
broccoli
Lycopersicon esculentum
oxidative stability
peas
rutabagas
Apium graveolens

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • eggs
  • emulsifiers
  • Lipid oxidation
  • vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions supplemented with vegetable powders",
abstract = "Summary: The effect of vegetable powders on the physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions was studied. Vegetable powders (beetroot, broccoli, carrot, celery, green pea, red pepper, spinach, swede, tomato and yellow pea) were added at 2.5{\%} (w/v) to emulsions prepared with rapeseed oil. The physical stability of the emulsions was characterised using the emulsifying activity (EAI) and the emulsifying stability indices (ESI) in addition to bright field microscopy. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was monitored by means of an accelerated oxidation test (Rancimat method). The addition of most vegetable powders did not markedly affect the physical stability of the emulsions although an adverse effect of tomato was observed. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was significantly improved in most cases as indicated by the Rancimat method with broccoli exhibiting the highest increase in induction time (98.2{\%}) compared with the control. Both polar and nonpolar antioxidants are likely to contribute to the overall chemical stability of this complex food system in a concentration-dependent manner.",
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author = "Vasileios Raikos and Madalina Neacsu and Philip Morrice and Garry Duthie",
year = "2014",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions supplemented with vegetable powders

AU - Raikos, Vasileios

AU - Neacsu, Madalina

AU - Morrice, Philip

AU - Duthie, Garry

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Summary: The effect of vegetable powders on the physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions was studied. Vegetable powders (beetroot, broccoli, carrot, celery, green pea, red pepper, spinach, swede, tomato and yellow pea) were added at 2.5% (w/v) to emulsions prepared with rapeseed oil. The physical stability of the emulsions was characterised using the emulsifying activity (EAI) and the emulsifying stability indices (ESI) in addition to bright field microscopy. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was monitored by means of an accelerated oxidation test (Rancimat method). The addition of most vegetable powders did not markedly affect the physical stability of the emulsions although an adverse effect of tomato was observed. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was significantly improved in most cases as indicated by the Rancimat method with broccoli exhibiting the highest increase in induction time (98.2%) compared with the control. Both polar and nonpolar antioxidants are likely to contribute to the overall chemical stability of this complex food system in a concentration-dependent manner.

AB - Summary: The effect of vegetable powders on the physicochemical stability of egg protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions was studied. Vegetable powders (beetroot, broccoli, carrot, celery, green pea, red pepper, spinach, swede, tomato and yellow pea) were added at 2.5% (w/v) to emulsions prepared with rapeseed oil. The physical stability of the emulsions was characterised using the emulsifying activity (EAI) and the emulsifying stability indices (ESI) in addition to bright field microscopy. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was monitored by means of an accelerated oxidation test (Rancimat method). The addition of most vegetable powders did not markedly affect the physical stability of the emulsions although an adverse effect of tomato was observed. The oxidative stability of the emulsions was significantly improved in most cases as indicated by the Rancimat method with broccoli exhibiting the highest increase in induction time (98.2%) compared with the control. Both polar and nonpolar antioxidants are likely to contribute to the overall chemical stability of this complex food system in a concentration-dependent manner.

KW - antioxidants

KW - eggs

KW - emulsifiers

KW - Lipid oxidation

KW - vegetables

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