Placing the North

Jeff Oliver, Neil Curtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The northern world was created through contingent social and material relations that can be traced to the history of European and Western expansion. Scientific modes of representation, coupled with new systems of circulation and new appetites for mass consumption, served to create a stable, if flexible, image of the north in regions to the south. These sets of southern-centric views and their material consequences have had variable impacts on people living in “the North” and have resulted in a mixed legacy. As historical and contemporary archaeologies are well placed to examine the material relations that helped to create, as well as contest, modern incursions, the aim of this issue is to explore these themes and to inspire future contributions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-20
Number of pages14
JournalHistorical Archaeology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

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Keywords

  • historical archaeology
  • Northern world
  • landscape
  • scientific practice
  • mapping
  • epistempology
  • modernity
  • exploration
  • indigenous perspectives
  • consumption
  • material culture
  • North

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Placing the North. / Oliver, Jeff; Curtis, Neil.

In: Historical Archaeology, Vol. 49, No. 3, 09.2015, p. 7-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oliver, Jeff ; Curtis, Neil. / Placing the North. In: Historical Archaeology. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 7-20.
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