Plasma Vitamin C Levels: Risk Factors for Deficiency and Association with Self-Reported Functional Health in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk

Stephen McCall, Allan B. Clark, Robert N. Luben, Nick J. Wareham, Kay-Tee Khaw, Phyo Myint (Corresponding Author)

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Abstract

Background: To investigate the demographic and lifestyles factors associated with vitamin C deficiency and to examine the association between plasma vitamin C level and self-reported physical functional health. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study. Plasma vitamin C level < 11 µmol/L indicated vitamin C deficiency. Unconditional logistic regression models assessed the association between vitamin C deficiency and potential risk factors. Associations between quartiles of vitamin C and self-reported functional health measured by the 36-item short-form questionnaire (SF-36) were assessed. Results: After adjustment, vitamin C deficiency was associated with older age, being male, lower physical activity, smoking, more socially deprived area (Townsend index) and a lower educational attainment. Compared to the highest, those in the lowest quartile of vitamin C were more likely to score in the lowest decile of physical function (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.43 (95%CI: 1.21–1.70)), bodily pain (aOR: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.07–1.56)), general health (aOR: 1.4 (95%CI: 1.18–1.66)), and vitality (aOR: 1.23 (95%CI: 1.04–1.45)) SF-36 scores. Conclusions: Simple public health interventions should be aimed at populations with risk factors for vitamin C deficiency. Poor self-reported functional health was associated with lower plasma vitamin C levels, which may reflect symptoms of latent scurvy.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1552
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2019

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Ascorbic Acid Deficiency
ascorbic acid deficiency
Ascorbic Acid
risk factors
ascorbic acid
odds ratio
neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Health
Neoplasms
Logistic Models
scurvy
Scurvy
Social Adjustment
cross-sectional studies
physical activity
Population
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
lifestyle
Life Style

Keywords

  • vitamin C
  • self-reported health
  • risk factors
  • EPIC-Norfolk
  • MORTALITY
  • PREDICTS
  • CLASSIFICATION
  • WOMEN
  • EPIC-NORFOLK
  • MEN
  • DISEASE
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • QUESTIONNAIRE

Cite this

Plasma Vitamin C Levels : Risk Factors for Deficiency and Association with Self-Reported Functional Health in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk. / McCall, Stephen; Clark, Allan B.; Luben, Robert N.; Wareham, Nick J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Myint, Phyo (Corresponding Author).

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 7, 1552, 09.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Plasma Vitamin C Levels: Risk Factors for Deficiency and Association with Self-Reported Functional Health in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk",
abstract = "Background: To investigate the demographic and lifestyles factors associated with vitamin C deficiency and to examine the association between plasma vitamin C level and self-reported physical functional health. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study. Plasma vitamin C level < 11 µmol/L indicated vitamin C deficiency. Unconditional logistic regression models assessed the association between vitamin C deficiency and potential risk factors. Associations between quartiles of vitamin C and self-reported functional health measured by the 36-item short-form questionnaire (SF-36) were assessed. Results: After adjustment, vitamin C deficiency was associated with older age, being male, lower physical activity, smoking, more socially deprived area (Townsend index) and a lower educational attainment. Compared to the highest, those in the lowest quartile of vitamin C were more likely to score in the lowest decile of physical function (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.43 (95{\%}CI: 1.21–1.70)), bodily pain (aOR: 1.29 (95{\%} CI: 1.07–1.56)), general health (aOR: 1.4 (95{\%}CI: 1.18–1.66)), and vitality (aOR: 1.23 (95{\%}CI: 1.04–1.45)) SF-36 scores. Conclusions: Simple public health interventions should be aimed at populations with risk factors for vitamin C deficiency. Poor self-reported functional health was associated with lower plasma vitamin C levels, which may reflect symptoms of latent scurvy.",
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author = "Stephen McCall and Clark, {Allan B.} and Luben, {Robert N.} and Wareham, {Nick J.} and Kay-Tee Khaw and Phyo Myint",
note = "EPIC-Norfolk is supported by Cancer Research UK and MRC, UK. Funders had no role in design, analysis and interpretation of the study results",
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T1 - Plasma Vitamin C Levels

T2 - Risk Factors for Deficiency and Association with Self-Reported Functional Health in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk

AU - McCall, Stephen

AU - Clark, Allan B.

AU - Luben, Robert N.

AU - Wareham, Nick J.

AU - Khaw, Kay-Tee

AU - Myint, Phyo

N1 - EPIC-Norfolk is supported by Cancer Research UK and MRC, UK. Funders had no role in design, analysis and interpretation of the study results

PY - 2019/7/9

Y1 - 2019/7/9

N2 - Background: To investigate the demographic and lifestyles factors associated with vitamin C deficiency and to examine the association between plasma vitamin C level and self-reported physical functional health. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study. Plasma vitamin C level < 11 µmol/L indicated vitamin C deficiency. Unconditional logistic regression models assessed the association between vitamin C deficiency and potential risk factors. Associations between quartiles of vitamin C and self-reported functional health measured by the 36-item short-form questionnaire (SF-36) were assessed. Results: After adjustment, vitamin C deficiency was associated with older age, being male, lower physical activity, smoking, more socially deprived area (Townsend index) and a lower educational attainment. Compared to the highest, those in the lowest quartile of vitamin C were more likely to score in the lowest decile of physical function (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.43 (95%CI: 1.21–1.70)), bodily pain (aOR: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.07–1.56)), general health (aOR: 1.4 (95%CI: 1.18–1.66)), and vitality (aOR: 1.23 (95%CI: 1.04–1.45)) SF-36 scores. Conclusions: Simple public health interventions should be aimed at populations with risk factors for vitamin C deficiency. Poor self-reported functional health was associated with lower plasma vitamin C levels, which may reflect symptoms of latent scurvy.

AB - Background: To investigate the demographic and lifestyles factors associated with vitamin C deficiency and to examine the association between plasma vitamin C level and self-reported physical functional health. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study. Plasma vitamin C level < 11 µmol/L indicated vitamin C deficiency. Unconditional logistic regression models assessed the association between vitamin C deficiency and potential risk factors. Associations between quartiles of vitamin C and self-reported functional health measured by the 36-item short-form questionnaire (SF-36) were assessed. Results: After adjustment, vitamin C deficiency was associated with older age, being male, lower physical activity, smoking, more socially deprived area (Townsend index) and a lower educational attainment. Compared to the highest, those in the lowest quartile of vitamin C were more likely to score in the lowest decile of physical function (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.43 (95%CI: 1.21–1.70)), bodily pain (aOR: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.07–1.56)), general health (aOR: 1.4 (95%CI: 1.18–1.66)), and vitality (aOR: 1.23 (95%CI: 1.04–1.45)) SF-36 scores. Conclusions: Simple public health interventions should be aimed at populations with risk factors for vitamin C deficiency. Poor self-reported functional health was associated with lower plasma vitamin C levels, which may reflect symptoms of latent scurvy.

KW - vitamin C

KW - self-reported health

KW - risk factors

KW - EPIC-Norfolk

KW - MORTALITY

KW - PREDICTS

KW - CLASSIFICATION

KW - WOMEN

KW - EPIC-NORFOLK

KW - MEN

KW - DISEASE

KW - PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY

KW - QUALITY-OF-LIFE

KW - QUESTIONNAIRE

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/plasma-vitamin-c-levels-risk-factors-deficiency-association-selfreported-functional-health-european

U2 - 10.3390/nu11071552

DO - 10.3390/nu11071552

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 7

M1 - 1552

ER -