Political Attitudes and Partisanship Among Australian Couples

Do Wives Matter?

Bernadette C Hayes, Clive S Bean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, political analysts have devoted considerable attention to gender differences in political behavior and attitudes. Despite this increase in research activity, however, the contribution of married women in assessing these differences is rarely investigated. In an effort to remedy this situation, this paper focuses not only on the political attitudes of married couples, but also on the degree to which the social background characteristics of married women determine both their own political attitudes and the political attitudes of their husbands. The results suggest that, for both husbands and wives, a person's own characteristics are generally just as important as the social characteristics of their spouse in predicting their own political attitudes, and that both husbands' and wives' characteristics also exert an independent influence on the political attitudes of their spouses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-81
Number of pages29
JournalWomen & Politics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

political attitude
wife
husband
spouse
social background
political behavior
married couple
remedies
gender-specific factors
human being

Cite this

Political Attitudes and Partisanship Among Australian Couples : Do Wives Matter? / Hayes, Bernadette C; Bean, Clive S.

In: Women & Politics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1994, p. 53-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7aa2ddeccaf248adb5d685f8403d2962,
title = "Political Attitudes and Partisanship Among Australian Couples: Do Wives Matter?",
abstract = "Over the past two decades, political analysts have devoted considerable attention to gender differences in political behavior and attitudes. Despite this increase in research activity, however, the contribution of married women in assessing these differences is rarely investigated. In an effort to remedy this situation, this paper focuses not only on the political attitudes of married couples, but also on the degree to which the social background characteristics of married women determine both their own political attitudes and the political attitudes of their husbands. The results suggest that, for both husbands and wives, a person's own characteristics are generally just as important as the social characteristics of their spouse in predicting their own political attitudes, and that both husbands' and wives' characteristics also exert an independent influence on the political attitudes of their spouses.",
author = "Hayes, {Bernadette C} and Bean, {Clive S}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1300/J014v14n01_03",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "53--81",
journal = "Women & Politics",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Political Attitudes and Partisanship Among Australian Couples

T2 - Do Wives Matter?

AU - Hayes, Bernadette C

AU - Bean, Clive S

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Over the past two decades, political analysts have devoted considerable attention to gender differences in political behavior and attitudes. Despite this increase in research activity, however, the contribution of married women in assessing these differences is rarely investigated. In an effort to remedy this situation, this paper focuses not only on the political attitudes of married couples, but also on the degree to which the social background characteristics of married women determine both their own political attitudes and the political attitudes of their husbands. The results suggest that, for both husbands and wives, a person's own characteristics are generally just as important as the social characteristics of their spouse in predicting their own political attitudes, and that both husbands' and wives' characteristics also exert an independent influence on the political attitudes of their spouses.

AB - Over the past two decades, political analysts have devoted considerable attention to gender differences in political behavior and attitudes. Despite this increase in research activity, however, the contribution of married women in assessing these differences is rarely investigated. In an effort to remedy this situation, this paper focuses not only on the political attitudes of married couples, but also on the degree to which the social background characteristics of married women determine both their own political attitudes and the political attitudes of their husbands. The results suggest that, for both husbands and wives, a person's own characteristics are generally just as important as the social characteristics of their spouse in predicting their own political attitudes, and that both husbands' and wives' characteristics also exert an independent influence on the political attitudes of their spouses.

U2 - 10.1300/J014v14n01_03

DO - 10.1300/J014v14n01_03

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 53

EP - 81

JO - Women & Politics

JF - Women & Politics

IS - 1

ER -