Polydextrose: its impact on short-term food intake and subjective feelings of satiety in males-a randomized controlled cross-over study

Dinesh Viren Ranawana, Adelaide Muller, C Jeya K Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Polydextrose is a low-calorie highly branched-chain glucose polymer that is poorly digested in the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore demonstrates fibre-like properties. Fibre has been shown to increase satiety and possibly reduce food intake. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine the effects of polydextrose on short-term satiety and energy intake.

METHODS: In a repeated-measures randomized blind cross-over design, 26 healthy males consumed a 400-g fruit smoothie containing 12 g (3 %) of polydextrose, and a buffet lunch 60 min after the smoothie. Motivational ratings for satiety and palatability and lunch energy intake were measured. The effects of the polydextrose-containing smoothie were compared against a polydextrose-free control smoothie.

RESULTS: Polydextrose did not significantly alter the taste and palatability of the fruit smoothie. Consuming the polydextrose-containing smoothie resulted in a significantly lower energy intake at lunch (102 kcal less) compared to the control.

CONCLUSION: Polydextrose may be a good fortificant for reducing short-term food intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-93
Number of pages9
JournalZeitschrift für Ernährungswissenschaft
Volume52
Issue number3
Early online date21 Jun 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Appetite Regulation
  • Beverages
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Diet, Reducing
  • Energy Intake
  • Food Additives
  • Food Preferences
  • Fruit
  • Glucans
  • Great Britain
  • Humans
  • Hyperphagia
  • Lunch
  • Male
  • Satiety Response
  • Single-Blind Method
  • Snacks
  • Young Adult

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