Poor sleep and depression are independently associated with a reduced pain threshold.Results of a population based study

Y. H. Chiu, A. J. Silman, Gary John MacFarlane, D. Ray, A. Gupta, C. Dickens, R. Morriss, J. McBeth

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128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the relative contributions of psychological factors and sleep disturbance to reduced pain threshold we conducted a cross-sectional two-phase population-based study. A total of 424 subjects were recruited, stratified by pain and distress status. Subjects completed a postal questionnaire that asked about current pain and covered aspects of psychological status and sleep disturbance. Samples, of subjects stratified by the extent of bodily pain they reported and psychological status were invited to participate in an examination of pain threshold. The association between psychological status, sleep disturbance and it low pain threshold wits examined using ordinal regression, High levels of psychological distress (OR= 1.6. 95% CI (0.02, 2.5)), disturbed sleep (OR= 2.2. 95% CI (1.4, 3.5)) and high scores on the HAD depression scale (OR= 2.1, 95% CI (1.3, 3.2)) were all associated with having a low pain threshold. In multivariate analysis disturbed sleep and depression remained independently associated with a low pain threshold. These relationships persisted after adjustment for pain status. This Study had demonstrated that depression and poor sleep are associated with a reduced pain threshold. (c) 2005 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-321
Number of pages5
JournalPain
Volume115
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • pain threshold
  • psychological
  • depression
  • sleep
  • CHRONIC WIDESPREAD PAIN
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
  • MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN
  • MAJOR DEPRESSION
  • HEALTHY-SUBJECTS
  • TENDER POINTS
  • FIBROMYALGIA
  • SYMPTOMS
  • SCALE
  • PERCEPTION

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