Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector

Fabrice Lalubin, Pierre Bize, Juan van Rooyen, Philippe Christe, Olivier Glaizot*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies of malaria or other vector-transmitted diseases often consider vectors as passive actors in the complex life cycle of the parasites, assuming that vector populations are homogeneous and vertebrate hosts are equally susceptible to being infected during their lifetime. However, some studies based on both human and rodent malaria systems found that mosquito vectors preferentially selected infected vertebrate hosts. This subject has been scarcely investigated in avian malaria models and even less in wild animals using natural host-parasite associations. We investigated whether the malaria infection status of wild great tits, Parus major, played a role in host selection by the mosquito vector Culex pipiens. Pairs of infected and uninfected birds were tested in a dual-choice olfactometer to assess their attractiveness to the mosquitoes. Plasmodium-infected birds attracted significantly fewer mosquitoes than the uninfected ones, which suggest that avian malaria parasites alter hosts' odours involved in vector orientation. Reaction time of the mosquitoes, that is, the time taken to select a host, and activation of mosquitoes, defined as the proportion of individuals flying towards one of the hosts, were not affected by the bird's infection status. The importance of these behavioural responses for the vector is discussed in light of recent advances in related or similar model systems. (C) 2012 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-545
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume84
Issue number3
Early online date3 Jul 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • avian malaria
  • Culex pipiens
  • dual-choice olfactometer
  • great tit
  • host choice
  • mosquito
  • Parus major
  • vector-borne disease
  • PLASMODIUM-YOELII-NIGERIENSIS
  • ANOPHELES-STEPHENSI MOSQUITOS
  • MEDIATED HOST PREFERENCE
  • AEDES-AEGYPTI
  • INSECT VECTORS
  • HAEMOPROTEUS INFECTIONS
  • GONOTROPHIC CYCLES
  • CULEX-NIGRIPALPUS
  • RELATIVE-HUMIDITY
  • SEEKING BEHAVIOR

Cite this

Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector. / Lalubin, Fabrice; Bize, Pierre; van Rooyen, Juan; Christe, Philippe; Glaizot, Olivier.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 84, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 539-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lalubin, F, Bize, P, van Rooyen, J, Christe, P & Glaizot, O 2012, 'Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector', Animal Behaviour, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 539-545. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.06.004
Lalubin, Fabrice ; Bize, Pierre ; van Rooyen, Juan ; Christe, Philippe ; Glaizot, Olivier. / Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector. In: Animal Behaviour. 2012 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 539-545.
@article{e8b3b92126b840ca8e39c6843b24044f,
title = "Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector",
abstract = "Epidemiological studies of malaria or other vector-transmitted diseases often consider vectors as passive actors in the complex life cycle of the parasites, assuming that vector populations are homogeneous and vertebrate hosts are equally susceptible to being infected during their lifetime. However, some studies based on both human and rodent malaria systems found that mosquito vectors preferentially selected infected vertebrate hosts. This subject has been scarcely investigated in avian malaria models and even less in wild animals using natural host-parasite associations. We investigated whether the malaria infection status of wild great tits, Parus major, played a role in host selection by the mosquito vector Culex pipiens. Pairs of infected and uninfected birds were tested in a dual-choice olfactometer to assess their attractiveness to the mosquitoes. Plasmodium-infected birds attracted significantly fewer mosquitoes than the uninfected ones, which suggest that avian malaria parasites alter hosts' odours involved in vector orientation. Reaction time of the mosquitoes, that is, the time taken to select a host, and activation of mosquitoes, defined as the proportion of individuals flying towards one of the hosts, were not affected by the bird's infection status. The importance of these behavioural responses for the vector is discussed in light of recent advances in related or similar model systems. (C) 2012 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "avian malaria, Culex pipiens, dual-choice olfactometer, great tit, host choice, mosquito, Parus major, vector-borne disease, PLASMODIUM-YOELII-NIGERIENSIS, ANOPHELES-STEPHENSI MOSQUITOS, MEDIATED HOST PREFERENCE, AEDES-AEGYPTI, INSECT VECTORS, HAEMOPROTEUS INFECTIONS, GONOTROPHIC CYCLES, CULEX-NIGRIPALPUS, RELATIVE-HUMIDITY, SEEKING BEHAVIOR",
author = "Fabrice Lalubin and Pierre Bize and {van Rooyen}, Juan and Philippe Christe and Olivier Glaizot",
note = "Acknowledgements This research is supported by grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation No31003A_120479 and No31003A_138187. We are very grateful to Luca Fumagalli for guidance in molecular work, Pierre Fontanillas, Nicolas Salamin and J{\'e}r{\^o}me Goudet for helpful advice with statistics, Laura Galbiati and L{\'e}o Gaillard for field assistance and two anonymous referees for comments on the manuscript.",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.06.004",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "539--545",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential evidence of parasite avoidance in an avian malarial vector

AU - Lalubin, Fabrice

AU - Bize, Pierre

AU - van Rooyen, Juan

AU - Christe, Philippe

AU - Glaizot, Olivier

N1 - Acknowledgements This research is supported by grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation No31003A_120479 and No31003A_138187. We are very grateful to Luca Fumagalli for guidance in molecular work, Pierre Fontanillas, Nicolas Salamin and Jérôme Goudet for helpful advice with statistics, Laura Galbiati and Léo Gaillard for field assistance and two anonymous referees for comments on the manuscript.

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Epidemiological studies of malaria or other vector-transmitted diseases often consider vectors as passive actors in the complex life cycle of the parasites, assuming that vector populations are homogeneous and vertebrate hosts are equally susceptible to being infected during their lifetime. However, some studies based on both human and rodent malaria systems found that mosquito vectors preferentially selected infected vertebrate hosts. This subject has been scarcely investigated in avian malaria models and even less in wild animals using natural host-parasite associations. We investigated whether the malaria infection status of wild great tits, Parus major, played a role in host selection by the mosquito vector Culex pipiens. Pairs of infected and uninfected birds were tested in a dual-choice olfactometer to assess their attractiveness to the mosquitoes. Plasmodium-infected birds attracted significantly fewer mosquitoes than the uninfected ones, which suggest that avian malaria parasites alter hosts' odours involved in vector orientation. Reaction time of the mosquitoes, that is, the time taken to select a host, and activation of mosquitoes, defined as the proportion of individuals flying towards one of the hosts, were not affected by the bird's infection status. The importance of these behavioural responses for the vector is discussed in light of recent advances in related or similar model systems. (C) 2012 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Epidemiological studies of malaria or other vector-transmitted diseases often consider vectors as passive actors in the complex life cycle of the parasites, assuming that vector populations are homogeneous and vertebrate hosts are equally susceptible to being infected during their lifetime. However, some studies based on both human and rodent malaria systems found that mosquito vectors preferentially selected infected vertebrate hosts. This subject has been scarcely investigated in avian malaria models and even less in wild animals using natural host-parasite associations. We investigated whether the malaria infection status of wild great tits, Parus major, played a role in host selection by the mosquito vector Culex pipiens. Pairs of infected and uninfected birds were tested in a dual-choice olfactometer to assess their attractiveness to the mosquitoes. Plasmodium-infected birds attracted significantly fewer mosquitoes than the uninfected ones, which suggest that avian malaria parasites alter hosts' odours involved in vector orientation. Reaction time of the mosquitoes, that is, the time taken to select a host, and activation of mosquitoes, defined as the proportion of individuals flying towards one of the hosts, were not affected by the bird's infection status. The importance of these behavioural responses for the vector is discussed in light of recent advances in related or similar model systems. (C) 2012 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - avian malaria

KW - Culex pipiens

KW - dual-choice olfactometer

KW - great tit

KW - host choice

KW - mosquito

KW - Parus major

KW - vector-borne disease

KW - PLASMODIUM-YOELII-NIGERIENSIS

KW - ANOPHELES-STEPHENSI MOSQUITOS

KW - MEDIATED HOST PREFERENCE

KW - AEDES-AEGYPTI

KW - INSECT VECTORS

KW - HAEMOPROTEUS INFECTIONS

KW - GONOTROPHIC CYCLES

KW - CULEX-NIGRIPALPUS

KW - RELATIVE-HUMIDITY

KW - SEEKING BEHAVIOR

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.06.004

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.06.004

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 539

EP - 545

JO - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 3

ER -