Predictably confirmatory: The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing

Johanna K. Falbén (Corresponding Author), Dimitra Tsamadi, Marius Golubickis, Juliana L. Olivier, Linn M. Persson, William A. Cunningham, C. Neil MacRae

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Abstract

Stereotypes facilitate the processing of expectancy-consistent (vs. expectancy-inconsistent) information, yet the underlying origin of this congruency effect remains unknown. As such, here we sought to identify the cognitive operations through which stereotypes influence decisional processing. In six experiments, participants responded to stimuli that were consistent or inconsistent with respect to prevailing gender stereotypes. To identify the processes underpinning task performance, responses were submitted to a hierarchical drift diffusion model (HDDM) analysis. A consistent pattern of results emerged. Whether manipulated at the level of occupational (Expts. 1, 3, & 5) or trait-based (Expts. 2, 4 & 6) expectancies, stereotypes facilitated task performance and influenced decisional processing via a combination of response and stimulus biases. Specifically: (i) stereotype-consistent stimuli were classified more rapidly than stereotype-inconsistent stimuli; (ii) stereotypic responses were favored over counter-stereotypic responses (i.e., starting-point shift towards stereotypic responses); (iii) less evidence was required when responding to stereotypic than counter-stereotypic stimuli (i.e., narrower threshold separation for stereotypic stimuli); and (iv) decisional evidence was accumulated more efficiently for stereotype-inconsistent than stereotype-consistent stimuli and when targets had a typical than atypical facial appearance. Collectively, these findings elucidate how stereotypes influence person construal.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2437-2451
Number of pages15
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume72
Issue number10
Early online date1 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Apr 2019

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Keywords

  • stereotypes
  • person construal
  • congruency effects
  • decisional processing
  • drift diffusion model
  • Stereotypes
  • GENDER STEREOTYPES
  • INFORMATION
  • MODEL
  • PSYCHOLOGY
  • PERCEPTION
  • IMPACT
  • SOCIAL STEREOTYPES
  • PERSON MEMORY
  • COGNITIVE-PROCESSES
  • PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Falbén, J. K., Tsamadi, D., Golubickis, M., Olivier, J. L., Persson, L. M., Cunningham, W. A., & MacRae, C. N. (2019). Predictably confirmatory: The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 72(10), 2437-2451. https://doi.org/10.1177/1747021819844219

Predictably confirmatory : The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing. / Falbén, Johanna K. (Corresponding Author); Tsamadi, Dimitra; Golubickis, Marius; Olivier, Juliana L.; Persson, Linn M.; Cunningham, William A. ; MacRae, C. Neil.

In: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 72, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 2437-2451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Falbén, JK, Tsamadi, D, Golubickis, M, Olivier, JL, Persson, LM, Cunningham, WA & MacRae, CN 2019, 'Predictably confirmatory: The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing' Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 72, no. 10, pp. 2437-2451. https://doi.org/10.1177/1747021819844219
Falbén JK, Tsamadi D, Golubickis M, Olivier JL, Persson LM, Cunningham WA et al. Predictably confirmatory: The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 2019 Oct 1;72(10):2437-2451. https://doi.org/10.1177/1747021819844219
Falbén, Johanna K. ; Tsamadi, Dimitra ; Golubickis, Marius ; Olivier, Juliana L. ; Persson, Linn M. ; Cunningham, William A. ; MacRae, C. Neil. / Predictably confirmatory : The influence of stereotypes during decisional processing. In: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 2019 ; Vol. 72, No. 10. pp. 2437-2451.
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