Predictions from harbor porpoise habitat association models are confirmed by long-term passive acoustic monitoring

Kate L. Brookes*, Helen Bailey, Paul M. Thompson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Survey based habitat association models provide good spatial coverage, but only a snapshot in time of a species' occurrence in a particular area. A habitat association model for harbor porpoises was created using data from five visual surveys of the Moray Firth, Scotland. Its predictions were tested over broader temporal scales using data from static passive acoustic loggers, deployed in two consecutive years. Predictions of relative abundance (individuals per kilometer of survey transect) were obtained for each 4 km x 4 km grid cell, and compared with the median number of hours per day that porpoises were acoustically detected in those cells. There was a significant, but weak, correlation between predicted relative abundance and acoustic estimates of occurrence, but this was stronger when predictions with high standard errors were omitted. When grid cells were grouped into those with low, medium, and high predicted relative abundance, there were similarly significant differences in acoustic detections, indicating that porpoises were acoustically detected more often in cells where the habitat model predicted higher numbers. The integration of acoustic and visual data added value to the interpretation of results from each, allowing validation of patterns in relative abundance recorded during snapshot visual surveys over longer time scales.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2523-2533
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume134
Issue number3
Early online dateAug 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Cite this

Predictions from harbor porpoise habitat association models are confirmed by long-term passive acoustic monitoring. / Brookes, Kate L.; Bailey, Helen; Thompson, Paul M.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 134, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 2523-2533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Survey based habitat association models provide good spatial coverage, but only a snapshot in time of a species' occurrence in a particular area. A habitat association model for harbor porpoises was created using data from five visual surveys of the Moray Firth, Scotland. Its predictions were tested over broader temporal scales using data from static passive acoustic loggers, deployed in two consecutive years. Predictions of relative abundance (individuals per kilometer of survey transect) were obtained for each 4 km x 4 km grid cell, and compared with the median number of hours per day that porpoises were acoustically detected in those cells. There was a significant, but weak, correlation between predicted relative abundance and acoustic estimates of occurrence, but this was stronger when predictions with high standard errors were omitted. When grid cells were grouped into those with low, medium, and high predicted relative abundance, there were similarly significant differences in acoustic detections, indicating that porpoises were acoustically detected more often in cells where the habitat model predicted higher numbers. The integration of acoustic and visual data added value to the interpretation of results from each, allowing validation of patterns in relative abundance recorded during snapshot visual surveys over longer time scales.",
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note = "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This study was supported by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change and its funding partners, the Scottish Government, Collaborative Offshore Wind Research Into the Environment (COWRIE) and Oil & Gas UK (O&GUK). We thank Moray Offshore Renewables Limited and Beatrice Offshore Wind farm Limited for access to the 2010 boat survey data that they commissioned from Natural Power and the University of Hull, Institute of Estuarine Coastal Studies, respectively. Additional data from 2004 and 2005 were supported by Talisman Energy (UK) Ltd. and the EU Framework VI Beatrice Demonstrator Project. Thanks are due to all the observers, boat crew and pilots who worked on these surveys and the boat crews who deployed and recovered CPODs. Thanks also to Phillip Hammond, Kelly Macleod, David Lusseau and Alex Douglas for advice on survey design and analysis, and to Barbara Cheney for constructive comments on the manuscript.",
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