Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer

Nicola M. Gray, Susan J. Hall, Susan Browne, Marie Johnston, Amanda J. Lee, Una Macleod, Elizabeth d Mitchell, Leslie Samuel, Neil C. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background People living with colorectal cancer are at risk of anxiety and depression. We investigated what factors were most highly associated with these.
Methods Four hundred and ninety-six people with colorectal cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on functioning, symptoms, illness perceptions and social difficulties were collected by questionnaire. Casenote-identified disease, treatment and co-morbidity data were
recorded. Multiple logistic regression identified factors independently predictive of anxiety and depression caseness.
Results Self-reported history of anxiety/depression predicted anxiety but not depression caseness. Depression caseness predicted anxiety caseness (p =0.043), as did poorer selfreported
cognitive functioning (p =0.001), dyspnoea (p = 0.015) or diarrhoea (p =0.021), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p <0.001) and having difficulties with finance (p =0.007). Having neo-adjuvant radiotherapy increased the odds of depression caseness (p =0.007), as did
poorer physical (p =0.007), cognitive (p <0.001) and social (p <0.001) functioning, having constipation (p =0.011), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p < 0.001), having difficulties with personal care (p =0.022) and communicating with others (p =0.014).
Conclusion Levels of anxiety caseness were similar to those of non-clinical samples, but depression caseness was higher, particularly in those who had received neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Most factors associated with possible or probable depression may be modified with appropriate intervention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume22
Issue number2
Early online date1 Oct 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Colorectal Neoplasms
Anxiety
Depression
Adjuvant Radiotherapy
Social Perception
Cancer Care Facilities
Constipation
Dyspnea
Diarrhea
Logistic Models
Morbidity

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • colorectal cancer

Cite this

Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer. / Gray, Nicola M.; Hall, Susan J.; Browne, Susan; Johnston, Marie; Lee, Amanda J.; Macleod, Una; Mitchell, Elizabeth d; Samuel, Leslie; Campbell, Neil C.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 22, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 307-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, NM, Hall, SJ, Browne, S, Johnston, M, Lee, AJ, Macleod, U, Mitchell, ED, Samuel, L & Campbell, NC 2014, 'Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer', Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 307-314. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-013-1963-8
Gray, Nicola M. ; Hall, Susan J. ; Browne, Susan ; Johnston, Marie ; Lee, Amanda J. ; Macleod, Una ; Mitchell, Elizabeth d ; Samuel, Leslie ; Campbell, Neil C. / Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 307-314.
@article{be099f2ee4904ce1a9520f60cdd95b6f,
title = "Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer",
abstract = "Background People living with colorectal cancer are at risk of anxiety and depression. We investigated what factors were most highly associated with these. Methods Four hundred and ninety-six people with colorectal cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on functioning, symptoms, illness perceptions and social difficulties were collected by questionnaire. Casenote-identified disease, treatment and co-morbidity data were recorded. Multiple logistic regression identified factors independently predictive of anxiety and depression caseness. Results Self-reported history of anxiety/depression predicted anxiety but not depression caseness. Depression caseness predicted anxiety caseness (p =0.043), as did poorer selfreported cognitive functioning (p =0.001), dyspnoea (p = 0.015) or diarrhoea (p =0.021), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p <0.001) and having difficulties with finance (p =0.007). Having neo-adjuvant radiotherapy increased the odds of depression caseness (p =0.007), as did poorer physical (p =0.007), cognitive (p <0.001) and social (p <0.001) functioning, having constipation (p =0.011), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p < 0.001), having difficulties with personal care (p =0.022) and communicating with others (p =0.014). Conclusion Levels of anxiety caseness were similar to those of non-clinical samples, but depression caseness was higher, particularly in those who had received neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Most factors associated with possible or probable depression may be modified with appropriate intervention.",
keywords = "anxiety , depression , colorectal cancer",
author = "Gray, {Nicola M.} and Hall, {Susan J.} and Susan Browne and Marie Johnston and Lee, {Amanda J.} and Una Macleod and Mitchell, {Elizabeth d} and Leslie Samuel and Campbell, {Neil C.}",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-013-1963-8",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "307--314",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of anxiety and depression in people with colorectal cancer

AU - Gray, Nicola M.

AU - Hall, Susan J.

AU - Browne, Susan

AU - Johnston, Marie

AU - Lee, Amanda J.

AU - Macleod, Una

AU - Mitchell, Elizabeth d

AU - Samuel, Leslie

AU - Campbell, Neil C.

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Background People living with colorectal cancer are at risk of anxiety and depression. We investigated what factors were most highly associated with these. Methods Four hundred and ninety-six people with colorectal cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on functioning, symptoms, illness perceptions and social difficulties were collected by questionnaire. Casenote-identified disease, treatment and co-morbidity data were recorded. Multiple logistic regression identified factors independently predictive of anxiety and depression caseness. Results Self-reported history of anxiety/depression predicted anxiety but not depression caseness. Depression caseness predicted anxiety caseness (p =0.043), as did poorer selfreported cognitive functioning (p =0.001), dyspnoea (p = 0.015) or diarrhoea (p =0.021), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p <0.001) and having difficulties with finance (p =0.007). Having neo-adjuvant radiotherapy increased the odds of depression caseness (p =0.007), as did poorer physical (p =0.007), cognitive (p <0.001) and social (p <0.001) functioning, having constipation (p =0.011), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p < 0.001), having difficulties with personal care (p =0.022) and communicating with others (p =0.014). Conclusion Levels of anxiety caseness were similar to those of non-clinical samples, but depression caseness was higher, particularly in those who had received neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Most factors associated with possible or probable depression may be modified with appropriate intervention.

AB - Background People living with colorectal cancer are at risk of anxiety and depression. We investigated what factors were most highly associated with these. Methods Four hundred and ninety-six people with colorectal cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data on functioning, symptoms, illness perceptions and social difficulties were collected by questionnaire. Casenote-identified disease, treatment and co-morbidity data were recorded. Multiple logistic regression identified factors independently predictive of anxiety and depression caseness. Results Self-reported history of anxiety/depression predicted anxiety but not depression caseness. Depression caseness predicted anxiety caseness (p =0.043), as did poorer selfreported cognitive functioning (p =0.001), dyspnoea (p = 0.015) or diarrhoea (p =0.021), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p <0.001) and having difficulties with finance (p =0.007). Having neo-adjuvant radiotherapy increased the odds of depression caseness (p =0.007), as did poorer physical (p =0.007), cognitive (p <0.001) and social (p <0.001) functioning, having constipation (p =0.011), reporting a high negative life and emotional impact (p < 0.001), having difficulties with personal care (p =0.022) and communicating with others (p =0.014). Conclusion Levels of anxiety caseness were similar to those of non-clinical samples, but depression caseness was higher, particularly in those who had received neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Most factors associated with possible or probable depression may be modified with appropriate intervention.

KW - anxiety

KW - depression

KW - colorectal cancer

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-013-1963-8

DO - 10.1007/s00520-013-1963-8

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 307

EP - 314

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 2

ER -