Preferential mantle lithospheric extension under the South China margin

Peter Dominic Clift, H. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Continental rifting in the South China Sea culminated in seafloor spreading at similar to 30 Ma (Late Oligocene). The basin and associated margins form a classic example of break-up in a relatively juvenile arc crust environment. In this study, we documented the tin-ling, distribution and amount of extension in the crust and mantle lithosphere on the South China Margin during this process. Applying a one-dimensional backstripping modeling technique to drilling data from the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) and Beibu Gulf Basin, we calculated subsidence rates of the wells and examined the timing and amount of extension. Our results show that extension of the crust exceeded that in the mantle lithosphere under the South China Shelf, but that the two varied in phase, suggesting depth-dependent extension rather than a lithospheric-scale detachment. Estimates of total crustal extension derived in this way are similar to those measured by seismic refraction, indicating that isostatic compensation is close to being local. Extension in the Beibu Gulf appears to be more uniform with depth, a difference that we attribute to the different style of strain accommodation during continental break-up compared to intra-continental rifting. Extension in PRMB and South China slope continues for similar to5 m.y. after the onset of seafloor spreading due to the weakness of the continental lithosphere. The timing of major extension is broadly mid-late Eocene to late Oligocene (similar to 45-25 Ma), but is impossible to correlate in detail with poorly dated strike-slip deformation in the Red River Fault Zone. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)929-945
Number of pages16
JournalMarine and Petroleum Geology
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • South China
  • extension
  • subsidence
  • Cenozoic
  • NORTH-SEA BASIN
  • CONTINENTAL LITHOSPHERE
  • CRUSTAL EXTENSION
  • EAST-AFRICAN
  • SHEAR ZONE
  • HONG-KONG
  • SUBSIDENCE
  • EVOLUTION
  • ANOMALIES
  • GRAVITY

Cite this

Preferential mantle lithospheric extension under the South China margin. / Clift, Peter Dominic; Lin, H.

In: Marine and Petroleum Geology, Vol. 18, 2001, p. 929-945.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clift, Peter Dominic ; Lin, H. / Preferential mantle lithospheric extension under the South China margin. In: Marine and Petroleum Geology. 2001 ; Vol. 18. pp. 929-945.
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AB - Continental rifting in the South China Sea culminated in seafloor spreading at similar to 30 Ma (Late Oligocene). The basin and associated margins form a classic example of break-up in a relatively juvenile arc crust environment. In this study, we documented the tin-ling, distribution and amount of extension in the crust and mantle lithosphere on the South China Margin during this process. Applying a one-dimensional backstripping modeling technique to drilling data from the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) and Beibu Gulf Basin, we calculated subsidence rates of the wells and examined the timing and amount of extension. Our results show that extension of the crust exceeded that in the mantle lithosphere under the South China Shelf, but that the two varied in phase, suggesting depth-dependent extension rather than a lithospheric-scale detachment. Estimates of total crustal extension derived in this way are similar to those measured by seismic refraction, indicating that isostatic compensation is close to being local. Extension in the Beibu Gulf appears to be more uniform with depth, a difference that we attribute to the different style of strain accommodation during continental break-up compared to intra-continental rifting. Extension in PRMB and South China slope continues for similar to5 m.y. after the onset of seafloor spreading due to the weakness of the continental lithosphere. The timing of major extension is broadly mid-late Eocene to late Oligocene (similar to 45-25 Ma), but is impossible to correlate in detail with poorly dated strike-slip deformation in the Red River Fault Zone. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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