Preliminary archaeoentomological analyses of permafrost-preserved cultural layers from the pre-contact Yup’ik Eskimo site of Nunalleq, Alaska: implications, potential and methodological considerations

Veronique Forbes, Kate Britton, Rick Knecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)
66 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

At Nunalleq, a pre-contact Yup’ik Eskimo village site in Alaska (14th-17th Century AD), abundant insect remains from highly organic substrates preserved within permafrost offer a unique opportunity to investigate past ecological and living conditions. This paper presents the preliminary results obtained from the analysis of two samples collected from floor layers in sod houses. The numerous and diverse insect remains highlight the exciting potential of archaeoentomology for reconstructing past ecological conditions, resource exploitation and the use of space at northern hunter-gatherer sites and have permitted the development of a strategy for the future collection of archaeoentomological data at permafrost-preserved sites in Alaska and elsewhere.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-167
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Archaeology
Volume20
Issue number2
Early online date5 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

Keywords

  • Archaeoentmology
  • Pre-contact Alaska
  • Ectoparasites
  • Methods

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