Preparing teachers for inclusive education: using inclusive pedagogy to enhance learning for all

Lani Florian, Holly Linklater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As the concept of ‘inclusive education’ has gained currency, students who would previously have been referred to specialist forms of provision, having been judged ‘less able’, are now believed to belong in mainstream classrooms. However, it is often argued that teachers lack the necessary knowledge and skills to work with such students in inclusive classrooms. This paper reports findings of a study of a new initial teacher education course that starts from the premise that the question is not whether teachers have the necessary knowledge and skills to teach in inclusive classrooms, but how to make best use of what they already know when learners experience difficulty. The theoretical rationale for the development of the course is outlined and examples of how teachers might engage in more inclusive practice are presented.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-386
Number of pages18
JournalCambridge Journal of Education
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Keywords

  • inclusive education
  • teacher education

Cite this

Preparing teachers for inclusive education : using inclusive pedagogy to enhance learning for all. / Florian, Lani; Linklater, Holly.

In: Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2010, p. 369-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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