Prevalence, incidence, primary care burden and medical treatment of angina in Scotland: age, sex and socioeconomic disparities: a population-based study

N. F. Murphy, Colin Richard Simpson, K. MacIntyre, F. A. McAlister, J. Chalmers, J. J. V. McMurray

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    Abstract

    Objective: To examine the epidemiology, primary care burden and treatment of angina in Scotland.

    Design: Cross-sectional data from primary care practices participating in the Scottish continuous morbidity recording scheme between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2002.

    Setting: 55 primary care practices (362 155 patients).

    Participants: 9508 patients with angina.

    Results: The prevalence of angina in Scotland was 28/1000 in men and 25/1000 in women (p < 0.05) and increased with age. The prevalence of angina also increased with increasing socioeconomic deprivation from 18/1000 in the least deprived category to 31/1000 in the most deprived group (p < 0.001 for trend). The incidence of angina was higher in men (1.8/1000) than in women (1.4/1000) (p = 0.004) and increased with increasing age and socioeconomic deprivation. Socioeconomically deprived patients (0.48 contacts/patient among the most deprived) were less likely than affluent patients (0.58 contacts/patient among the least deprived) to see their general practitioner on an ongoing basis p = 0.006 for trend). Among men, 52% were prescribed beta blockers, 44% calcium channel blockers, 72% aspirin, 54% statins and 36% angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The corresponding prescription rates for women were 46% (p < 0.001), 41% (p = 0.02), 69% (p < 0.001), 45% (p < 0.001) and 30% (p < 0.001). Among patients, 75 years old 52% were prescribed a b blocker and 58% a statin. The corresponding figures for patients >= 75 years were 42% (p < 0.001) and 31% (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: Angina is a common condition, more so in men than in women. Socioeconomically deprived patients are more likely to have angina but are less likely to consult their general practitioner. Guideline-recommended treatments for angina are underused in women and older patients. These suboptimal practice patterns, which are worst in older women, are of particular concern, as in Scotland more women ( and particularly older women) than men have angina.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1047-1054
    Number of pages7
    JournalHeart
    Volume92
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

    Keywords

    • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
    • ROSE QUESTIONNAIRE ANGINA
    • II PROSPECTIVE COHORT
    • HIGH-RISK PATIENTS
    • STABLE ANGINA
    • GENERAL-PRACTICE
    • COMMUNITY SURVEILLANCE
    • CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS
    • MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
    • GENDER-DIFFERENCES

    Cite this

    Prevalence, incidence, primary care burden and medical treatment of angina in Scotland: age, sex and socioeconomic disparities: a population-based study. / Murphy, N. F.; Simpson, Colin Richard; MacIntyre, K.; McAlister, F. A.; Chalmers, J.; McMurray, J. J. V.

    In: Heart, Vol. 92, 07.2006, p. 1047-1054.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Murphy, N. F. ; Simpson, Colin Richard ; MacIntyre, K. ; McAlister, F. A. ; Chalmers, J. ; McMurray, J. J. V. / Prevalence, incidence, primary care burden and medical treatment of angina in Scotland: age, sex and socioeconomic disparities: a population-based study. In: Heart. 2006 ; Vol. 92. pp. 1047-1054.
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    title = "Prevalence, incidence, primary care burden and medical treatment of angina in Scotland: age, sex and socioeconomic disparities: a population-based study",
    abstract = "Objective: To examine the epidemiology, primary care burden and treatment of angina in Scotland.Design: Cross-sectional data from primary care practices participating in the Scottish continuous morbidity recording scheme between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2002.Setting: 55 primary care practices (362 155 patients).Participants: 9508 patients with angina.Results: The prevalence of angina in Scotland was 28/1000 in men and 25/1000 in women (p < 0.05) and increased with age. The prevalence of angina also increased with increasing socioeconomic deprivation from 18/1000 in the least deprived category to 31/1000 in the most deprived group (p < 0.001 for trend). The incidence of angina was higher in men (1.8/1000) than in women (1.4/1000) (p = 0.004) and increased with increasing age and socioeconomic deprivation. Socioeconomically deprived patients (0.48 contacts/patient among the most deprived) were less likely than affluent patients (0.58 contacts/patient among the least deprived) to see their general practitioner on an ongoing basis p = 0.006 for trend). Among men, 52{\%} were prescribed beta blockers, 44{\%} calcium channel blockers, 72{\%} aspirin, 54{\%} statins and 36{\%} angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The corresponding prescription rates for women were 46{\%} (p < 0.001), 41{\%} (p = 0.02), 69{\%} (p < 0.001), 45{\%} (p < 0.001) and 30{\%} (p < 0.001). Among patients, 75 years old 52{\%} were prescribed a b blocker and 58{\%} a statin. The corresponding figures for patients >= 75 years were 42{\%} (p < 0.001) and 31{\%} (p < 0.001).Conclusions: Angina is a common condition, more so in men than in women. Socioeconomically deprived patients are more likely to have angina but are less likely to consult their general practitioner. Guideline-recommended treatments for angina are underused in women and older patients. These suboptimal practice patterns, which are worst in older women, are of particular concern, as in Scotland more women ( and particularly older women) than men have angina.",
    keywords = "CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, ROSE QUESTIONNAIRE ANGINA, II PROSPECTIVE COHORT, HIGH-RISK PATIENTS, STABLE ANGINA, GENERAL-PRACTICE, COMMUNITY SURVEILLANCE, CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS, MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, GENDER-DIFFERENCES",
    author = "Murphy, {N. F.} and Simpson, {Colin Richard} and K. MacIntyre and McAlister, {F. A.} and J. Chalmers and McMurray, {J. J. V.}",
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    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Prevalence, incidence, primary care burden and medical treatment of angina in Scotland: age, sex and socioeconomic disparities: a population-based study

    AU - Murphy, N. F.

    AU - Simpson, Colin Richard

    AU - MacIntyre, K.

    AU - McAlister, F. A.

    AU - Chalmers, J.

    AU - McMurray, J. J. V.

    PY - 2006/7

    Y1 - 2006/7

    N2 - Objective: To examine the epidemiology, primary care burden and treatment of angina in Scotland.Design: Cross-sectional data from primary care practices participating in the Scottish continuous morbidity recording scheme between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2002.Setting: 55 primary care practices (362 155 patients).Participants: 9508 patients with angina.Results: The prevalence of angina in Scotland was 28/1000 in men and 25/1000 in women (p < 0.05) and increased with age. The prevalence of angina also increased with increasing socioeconomic deprivation from 18/1000 in the least deprived category to 31/1000 in the most deprived group (p < 0.001 for trend). The incidence of angina was higher in men (1.8/1000) than in women (1.4/1000) (p = 0.004) and increased with increasing age and socioeconomic deprivation. Socioeconomically deprived patients (0.48 contacts/patient among the most deprived) were less likely than affluent patients (0.58 contacts/patient among the least deprived) to see their general practitioner on an ongoing basis p = 0.006 for trend). Among men, 52% were prescribed beta blockers, 44% calcium channel blockers, 72% aspirin, 54% statins and 36% angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The corresponding prescription rates for women were 46% (p < 0.001), 41% (p = 0.02), 69% (p < 0.001), 45% (p < 0.001) and 30% (p < 0.001). Among patients, 75 years old 52% were prescribed a b blocker and 58% a statin. The corresponding figures for patients >= 75 years were 42% (p < 0.001) and 31% (p < 0.001).Conclusions: Angina is a common condition, more so in men than in women. Socioeconomically deprived patients are more likely to have angina but are less likely to consult their general practitioner. Guideline-recommended treatments for angina are underused in women and older patients. These suboptimal practice patterns, which are worst in older women, are of particular concern, as in Scotland more women ( and particularly older women) than men have angina.

    AB - Objective: To examine the epidemiology, primary care burden and treatment of angina in Scotland.Design: Cross-sectional data from primary care practices participating in the Scottish continuous morbidity recording scheme between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2002.Setting: 55 primary care practices (362 155 patients).Participants: 9508 patients with angina.Results: The prevalence of angina in Scotland was 28/1000 in men and 25/1000 in women (p < 0.05) and increased with age. The prevalence of angina also increased with increasing socioeconomic deprivation from 18/1000 in the least deprived category to 31/1000 in the most deprived group (p < 0.001 for trend). The incidence of angina was higher in men (1.8/1000) than in women (1.4/1000) (p = 0.004) and increased with increasing age and socioeconomic deprivation. Socioeconomically deprived patients (0.48 contacts/patient among the most deprived) were less likely than affluent patients (0.58 contacts/patient among the least deprived) to see their general practitioner on an ongoing basis p = 0.006 for trend). Among men, 52% were prescribed beta blockers, 44% calcium channel blockers, 72% aspirin, 54% statins and 36% angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The corresponding prescription rates for women were 46% (p < 0.001), 41% (p = 0.02), 69% (p < 0.001), 45% (p < 0.001) and 30% (p < 0.001). Among patients, 75 years old 52% were prescribed a b blocker and 58% a statin. The corresponding figures for patients >= 75 years were 42% (p < 0.001) and 31% (p < 0.001).Conclusions: Angina is a common condition, more so in men than in women. Socioeconomically deprived patients are more likely to have angina but are less likely to consult their general practitioner. Guideline-recommended treatments for angina are underused in women and older patients. These suboptimal practice patterns, which are worst in older women, are of particular concern, as in Scotland more women ( and particularly older women) than men have angina.

    KW - CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE

    KW - ROSE QUESTIONNAIRE ANGINA

    KW - II PROSPECTIVE COHORT

    KW - HIGH-RISK PATIENTS

    KW - STABLE ANGINA

    KW - GENERAL-PRACTICE

    KW - COMMUNITY SURVEILLANCE

    KW - CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    KW - MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION

    KW - GENDER-DIFFERENCES

    U2 - 10.1136/hrt.2005.069419

    DO - 10.1136/hrt.2005.069419

    M3 - Article

    VL - 92

    SP - 1047

    EP - 1054

    JO - Heart

    JF - Heart

    SN - 1355-6037

    ER -