Prevalence of hypodontia and associated factors

a systematic review and meta-analysis

Khaled Khalaf, John Miskelly, Elena Voge, Tatiana MacFarlane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with hypotonia.

DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

DATA SOURCE: A search strategy was developed along with inclusion criteria and run in MEDLINE and EMBASE (published from 2002 to August 2012) databases to reveal all studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors. A hand search of reference lists and a Google search aimed to improve the sensitivity of the literature search.

SELECTION CRITERIA: All studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors published from 2002 onwards were included. Abstracts of non-English papers were also analyzed.

DATA SELECTION AND EXTRACTION: All potential articles were checked against the inclusion criteria independently, and in duplicate by two investigators. A checklist was used to assess the quality of selected studies.

MAIN OUTCOME: Prevalence of hypodontia, excluding third molars.

RESULTS: The overall prevalence of hypodontia was found to be 6.4% (95% CI: 5.7, 7.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of hypodontia by continent (Q = 34.18, P<0.001). Prevalence of hypodontia was the highest in Africa: 13.4% (95% CI: 9.7, 18.0), followed by Europe (7% CI: 6.0-8.0%), Asia (6.3% CI: 4.4, 9.1) and Australia (6.3% CI: 5.3, 7.4) with a lower prevalence in North America (5.0% CI: 4.1-5.9) and Latin America and Caribbean (4.4% CI: 3.2-6.1). Females were found to have a higher prevalence than males (combined OR 1.22; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.30). The most commonly affected teeth were mandibular second premolars followed by maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary second premolars. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe hypodontia was found to be 81.6, 14.3 and 3.1% respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: There was a high variation in the prevalence of hypodontia between the studies. African populations were found to have a higher risk for tooth agenesis and there was an increased risk for females to have hypodontia than males.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-316
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Orthodontics
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

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Anodontia
Meta-Analysis
Bicuspid
Tooth
Cross-Sectional Studies
Muscle Hypotonia
Third Molar
Latin America
Incisor
North America
Checklist
MEDLINE
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Keywords

  • hypodontia
  • dental agenesis
  • congenitally absent teeth
  • prevalence
  • epidemiology

Cite this

Prevalence of hypodontia and associated factors : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Khalaf, Khaled; Miskelly, John; Voge, Elena; MacFarlane, Tatiana.

In: Journal of Orthodontics, Vol. 41, No. 4, 12.2014, p. 299-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khalaf, Khaled ; Miskelly, John ; Voge, Elena ; MacFarlane, Tatiana. / Prevalence of hypodontia and associated factors : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Journal of Orthodontics. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 4. pp. 299-316.
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AU - Khalaf, Khaled

AU - Miskelly, John

AU - Voge, Elena

AU - MacFarlane, Tatiana

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with hypotonia.DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.DATA SOURCE: A search strategy was developed along with inclusion criteria and run in MEDLINE and EMBASE (published from 2002 to August 2012) databases to reveal all studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors. A hand search of reference lists and a Google search aimed to improve the sensitivity of the literature search.SELECTION CRITERIA: All studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors published from 2002 onwards were included. Abstracts of non-English papers were also analyzed.DATA SELECTION AND EXTRACTION: All potential articles were checked against the inclusion criteria independently, and in duplicate by two investigators. A checklist was used to assess the quality of selected studies.MAIN OUTCOME: Prevalence of hypodontia, excluding third molars.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of hypodontia was found to be 6.4% (95% CI: 5.7, 7.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of hypodontia by continent (Q = 34.18, P<0.001). Prevalence of hypodontia was the highest in Africa: 13.4% (95% CI: 9.7, 18.0), followed by Europe (7% CI: 6.0-8.0%), Asia (6.3% CI: 4.4, 9.1) and Australia (6.3% CI: 5.3, 7.4) with a lower prevalence in North America (5.0% CI: 4.1-5.9) and Latin America and Caribbean (4.4% CI: 3.2-6.1). Females were found to have a higher prevalence than males (combined OR 1.22; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.30). The most commonly affected teeth were mandibular second premolars followed by maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary second premolars. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe hypodontia was found to be 81.6, 14.3 and 3.1% respectively.CONCLUSIONS: There was a high variation in the prevalence of hypodontia between the studies. African populations were found to have a higher risk for tooth agenesis and there was an increased risk for females to have hypodontia than males.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with hypotonia.DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.DATA SOURCE: A search strategy was developed along with inclusion criteria and run in MEDLINE and EMBASE (published from 2002 to August 2012) databases to reveal all studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors. A hand search of reference lists and a Google search aimed to improve the sensitivity of the literature search.SELECTION CRITERIA: All studies on the prevalence of hypodontia or associated factors published from 2002 onwards were included. Abstracts of non-English papers were also analyzed.DATA SELECTION AND EXTRACTION: All potential articles were checked against the inclusion criteria independently, and in duplicate by two investigators. A checklist was used to assess the quality of selected studies.MAIN OUTCOME: Prevalence of hypodontia, excluding third molars.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of hypodontia was found to be 6.4% (95% CI: 5.7, 7.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of hypodontia by continent (Q = 34.18, P<0.001). Prevalence of hypodontia was the highest in Africa: 13.4% (95% CI: 9.7, 18.0), followed by Europe (7% CI: 6.0-8.0%), Asia (6.3% CI: 4.4, 9.1) and Australia (6.3% CI: 5.3, 7.4) with a lower prevalence in North America (5.0% CI: 4.1-5.9) and Latin America and Caribbean (4.4% CI: 3.2-6.1). Females were found to have a higher prevalence than males (combined OR 1.22; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.30). The most commonly affected teeth were mandibular second premolars followed by maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary second premolars. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe hypodontia was found to be 81.6, 14.3 and 3.1% respectively.CONCLUSIONS: There was a high variation in the prevalence of hypodontia between the studies. African populations were found to have a higher risk for tooth agenesis and there was an increased risk for females to have hypodontia than males.

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KW - dental agenesis

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