Prognosis of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preadolescents: A prospective 4-year follow-up study till adolescence

Ashraf Abdel Salam El Metwally, J. J. Salminen, A. Auvinen, H. Kautiainen, M. Mikkelsson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    148 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Musculoskeletal pain is common in children but studies on the outcome and predictive factors for persistence/recurrence of these symptoms are scarce. A baseline cross-sectional survey of 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8) identified 564 (32.1%) children with musculoskeletal pain. At baseline, these children were evaluated using a structured questionnaire and examined for hypermobility and physical fitness. The children were re-evaluated after one year, and four years (at adolescence) using the same pain questionnaire. At 1-year follow-up, 53.8% (95% CI 48.8-58.8) of the children reported pain persistence (persistent preadolescent musculoskeletal pain). At 4-year follow-up, 63.5% (95% CI 58.7-68.1) of them had musculoskeletal pain. Neck was the site with most persistent/recurrent musculoskeletal pain. Those with persistent preadolescent musculoskeletal pain had approximately three times higher risk of pain recurrence (OR = 2.90 [95% CI 1.9-4.4]). In the univariate analysis, female gender, older age group (11 +), hypermobility, co-existence of psychosomatic symptoms, having high disability index, and reporting combined musculoskeletal pain at baseline predicted pain recurrence at adolescence. In the multivariate analysis, age, headache, hypermobility and having combined musculoskeletal pain were found as independent predictors. Statistically significant sex interactions were found for age, depressive feelings, waking up during nights and hypermobility. More psychosomatic symptoms predicted pain recurrence in girls than in boys, and hypermobility was a strong predictor in females only. Musculoskeletal pain in preadolescents is not a self-limiting phenomenon and more studies are still warranted to explore its determinants aiming to improve the long-term outcome of these symptoms. (C) 2004 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)550-559
    Number of pages9
    JournalPain
    Volume110
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

    Keywords

    • musculoskeletal pain
    • preadolescents
    • children
    • hypermobility
    • prognosis
    • LOW-BACK-PAIN
    • RECURRENT ABDOMINAL-PAIN
    • RISK-FACTORS
    • PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS
    • FINNISH ADOLESCENTS
    • JOINT HYPERMOBILITY
    • SCHOOL-CHILDREN
    • SHOULDER PAIN
    • SCHOOLCHILDREN
    • YOUNG

    Cite this

    El Metwally, A. A. S., Salminen, J. J., Auvinen, A., Kautiainen, H., & Mikkelsson, M. (2004). Prognosis of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preadolescents: A prospective 4-year follow-up study till adolescence. Pain, 110, 550-559. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.PAIN.2004.03.021

    Prognosis of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preadolescents: A prospective 4-year follow-up study till adolescence. / El Metwally, Ashraf Abdel Salam; Salminen, J. J.; Auvinen, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Mikkelsson, M.

    In: Pain, Vol. 110, 08.2004, p. 550-559.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    El Metwally, Ashraf Abdel Salam ; Salminen, J. J. ; Auvinen, A. ; Kautiainen, H. ; Mikkelsson, M. / Prognosis of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preadolescents: A prospective 4-year follow-up study till adolescence. In: Pain. 2004 ; Vol. 110. pp. 550-559.
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