Projecting species' range expansion dynamics: Sources of systematic biases when scaling up patterns and processes

Greta Bocedi*, Guy Pe'er, Risto K. Heikkinen, Yiannis Matsinos, Justin M J Travis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. Dynamic simulation models are a promising tool for assessing how species respond to habitat fragmentation and climate change. However, sensitivity of their outputs to impacts of spatial resolution is insufficiently known. 2. Using an individual-based dynamic model for species' range expansion, we demonstrate an inherent risk of substantial biases resulting from choices relating to the resolution at which key patterns and processes are modelled. 3. Increasing cell size leads to overestimating dispersal distances, the extent of the range shift and population size. Overestimation accelerates with cell size for species with short dispersal capacity and is particularly severe in highly fragmented landscapes. 4. The overestimation results from three main interacting sources: homogenisation of spatial information, alteration of dispersal kernels and stabilisation/aggregation of population dynamics. 5. We urge for caution in selecting the spatial resolution used in dynamic simulations and other predictive models and highlight the urgent need to develop upscaling methods that maintain important patterns and processes at fine scales.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1008-1018
Number of pages11
JournalMethods in Ecology and Evolution
Volume3
Issue number6
Early online date24 Jul 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

range expansion
dynamic models
spatial resolution
homogenization
habitat fragmentation
simulation models
population size
population dynamics
upscaling
climate change
cells
simulation
stabilization
seeds
methodology

Keywords

  • Biases
  • Dispersal
  • Dynamic modelling
  • Individual-based model
  • Map resolution
  • Population dynamics
  • Range expansion
  • Scaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecological Modelling

Cite this

Projecting species' range expansion dynamics : Sources of systematic biases when scaling up patterns and processes. / Bocedi, Greta; Pe'er, Guy; Heikkinen, Risto K.; Matsinos, Yiannis; Travis, Justin M J.

In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 3, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 1008-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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