Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media

Isla MacKenzie, Li Wei, Daniel Rutherford, Evelyn A. Findlay, Wendy Saywood, Marion Kay Campbell, Thomas M MacDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM

To increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland.

METHODS

A generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later.

RESULTS

There was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P < 0.01). Of those who recalled the advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign ['yes' 31.3% (28.4, 34.1) prior; 30.4% (27.6, 33.2) following; difference = -0.9%; 95% CI for difference -4.8, 3.1%; P = 0.92].

CONCLUSIONS

It is possible to raise public awareness of clinical research using the media, but further efforts may be required to influence individuals' decisions to take part in clinical research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-135
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume69
Issue number2
Early online date8 Oct 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • media
  • public engagement
  • randomised clinical trials
  • participation

Cite this

Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media. / MacKenzie, Isla; Wei, Li; Rutherford, Daniel; Findlay, Evelyn A. ; Saywood, Wendy; Campbell, Marion Kay; MacDonald, Thomas M.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 69, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 128-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MacKenzie, I, Wei, L, Rutherford, D, Findlay, EA, Saywood, W, Campbell, MK & MacDonald, TM 2010, 'Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media', British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 69, no. 2, pp. 128-135. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2009.03561.x
MacKenzie, Isla ; Wei, Li ; Rutherford, Daniel ; Findlay, Evelyn A. ; Saywood, Wendy ; Campbell, Marion Kay ; MacDonald, Thomas M. / Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media. In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2010 ; Vol. 69, No. 2. pp. 128-135.
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abstract = "AIMTo increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland.METHODSA generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later.RESULTSThere was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8{\%} (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4{\%}; 95{\%} CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P < 0.01). Of those who recalled the advertising, 49{\%} felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign ['yes' 31.3{\%} (28.4, 34.1) prior; 30.4{\%} (27.6, 33.2) following; difference = -0.9{\%}; 95{\%} CI for difference -4.8, 3.1{\%}; P = 0.92].CONCLUSIONSIt is possible to raise public awareness of clinical research using the media, but further efforts may be required to influence individuals' decisions to take part in clinical research.",
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AU - MacKenzie, Isla

AU - Wei, Li

AU - Rutherford, Daniel

AU - Findlay, Evelyn A.

AU - Saywood, Wendy

AU - Campbell, Marion Kay

AU - MacDonald, Thomas M

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N2 - AIMTo increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland.METHODSA generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later.RESULTSThere was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P < 0.01). Of those who recalled the advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign ['yes' 31.3% (28.4, 34.1) prior; 30.4% (27.6, 33.2) following; difference = -0.9%; 95% CI for difference -4.8, 3.1%; P = 0.92].CONCLUSIONSIt is possible to raise public awareness of clinical research using the media, but further efforts may be required to influence individuals' decisions to take part in clinical research.

AB - AIMTo increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland.METHODSA generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later.RESULTSThere was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P < 0.01). Of those who recalled the advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign ['yes' 31.3% (28.4, 34.1) prior; 30.4% (27.6, 33.2) following; difference = -0.9%; 95% CI for difference -4.8, 3.1%; P = 0.92].CONCLUSIONSIt is possible to raise public awareness of clinical research using the media, but further efforts may be required to influence individuals' decisions to take part in clinical research.

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KW - randomised clinical trials

KW - participation

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VL - 69

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JO - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

JF - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

SN - 0306-5251

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