Protein for Life

Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults

Marta Lonnie, Emma Hooker, Jeffrey M Brunstrom, Bernard M Corfe, Mark A Green, Anthony W Watson, Elizabeth A Williams, Emma J Stevenson, Simon Penson, Alexandra M Johnstone

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

With an ageing population, dietary approaches to promote health and independence later in life are needed. In part, this can be achieved by maintaining muscle mass and strength as people age. New evidence suggests that current dietary recommendations for protein intake may be insufficient to achieve this goal and that individuals might benefit by increasing their intake and frequency of consumption of high-quality protein. However, the environmental effects of increasing animal-protein production are a concern, and alternative, more sustainable protein sources should be considered. Protein is known to be more satiating than other macronutrients, and it is unclear whether diets high in plant proteins affect the appetite of older adults as they should be recommended for individuals at risk of malnutrition. The review considers the protein needs of an ageing population (>40 years old), sustainable protein sources, appetite-related implications of diets high in plant proteins, and related areas for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number360
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Appetite
appetite
protein intake
plant proteins
protein sources
Plant Proteins
Proteins
proteins
dietary recommendations
risk groups
animal proteins
diet
malnutrition
Diet
muscles
Dietary Proteins
Muscle Strength
Malnutrition
Population
Health

Keywords

  • Journal Article
  • Review
  • aging
  • appetite
  • older adults
  • plant proteins
  • sarcopenia
  • sustainability

Cite this

Protein for Life : Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults. / Lonnie, Marta; Hooker, Emma; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Corfe, Bernard M; Green, Mark A; Watson, Anthony W; Williams, Elizabeth A; Stevenson, Emma J; Penson, Simon; Johnstone, Alexandra M.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 3, 360, 16.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Lonnie, M, Hooker, E, Brunstrom, JM, Corfe, BM, Green, MA, Watson, AW, Williams, EA, Stevenson, EJ, Penson, S & Johnstone, AM 2018, 'Protein for Life: Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults', Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 3, 360. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030360
Lonnie, Marta ; Hooker, Emma ; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M ; Corfe, Bernard M ; Green, Mark A ; Watson, Anthony W ; Williams, Elizabeth A ; Stevenson, Emma J ; Penson, Simon ; Johnstone, Alexandra M. / Protein for Life : Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.
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