Protocol for a feasibility study of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for the reduction of dental anxiety in young people

Zoe Marshman, Annie Morgan, Jenny Porritt, Ekta Gupta, Sarah Baker, Cathy Creswell, Tim Newton, Katherine Stevens, Christopher Williams, Suneeta Prasad, Jennifer Kirby, Helen Rodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
Childhood dental anxiety is very common, with 10–20 % of children and young people reporting high levels of dental anxiety. It is distressing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of young people and their parents as well as being associated with poor oral health. Affected individuals may develop a lifelong reliance on general anaesthetic or sedation for necessary dental treatment thus requiring the support of specialist dental services. Children and young people with dental anxiety therefore require additional clinical time and can be costly to treat in the long term. The reduction of dental anxiety through the use of effective psychological techniques is, therefore, of high importance. However, there is a lack of high-quality research investigating the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches when applied to young people’s dental anxiety.

Methods/design
The first part of the study will develop a profile of dentally anxious young people using a prospective questionnaire sent to a consecutive sample of 100 young people referred to the Paediatric Dentistry Department, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, in Sheffield. The second part will involve interviewing a purposive sample of 15–20 dental team members on their perceptions of a CBT self-help resource for dental anxiety, their opinions on whether they might use such a resource with patients, and their willingness to recruit participants to a future randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the resource. The third part of the study will investigate the most appropriate outcome measures to include in a trial, the acceptability of the resource, and retention and completion rates of treatment with a sample of 60 dentally anxious young people using the CBT resource.

Discussion
This study will provide information on the profile of dentally anxious young people who could potentially be helped by a guided self-help CBT resource. It will gain the perceptions of dental care team members of guided self-help CBT for dental anxiety in young people and their willingness to recruit participants to a trial. Acceptability of the resource to participants and retention and completion rates will also be investigated to inform a future RCT.
Original languageEnglish
Article number13
JournalPilot & Feasibility Studies
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Dental Anxiety
Feasibility Studies
Cognitive Therapy
Tooth
Randomized Controlled Trials
Psychological Techniques
Pediatric Dentistry
General Anesthetics
Dental Care
Oral Health
Parents
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • dental anxiety
  • CBT
  • children
  • young people
  • feasibility study
  • CBT self-help
  • low intensity
  • qualitative research

Cite this

Protocol for a feasibility study of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for the reduction of dental anxiety in young people. / Marshman, Zoe; Morgan, Annie; Porritt, Jenny; Gupta, Ekta; Baker, Sarah; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Stevens, Katherine; Williams, Christopher; Prasad, Suneeta; Kirby, Jennifer; Rodd, Helen.

In: Pilot & Feasibility Studies, Vol. 2, 13, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marshman, Z, Morgan, A, Porritt, J, Gupta, E, Baker, S, Creswell, C, Newton, T, Stevens, K, Williams, C, Prasad, S, Kirby, J & Rodd, H 2016, 'Protocol for a feasibility study of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for the reduction of dental anxiety in young people', Pilot & Feasibility Studies, vol. 2, 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-016-0054-2
Marshman, Zoe ; Morgan, Annie ; Porritt, Jenny ; Gupta, Ekta ; Baker, Sarah ; Creswell, Cathy ; Newton, Tim ; Stevens, Katherine ; Williams, Christopher ; Prasad, Suneeta ; Kirby, Jennifer ; Rodd, Helen. / Protocol for a feasibility study of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for the reduction of dental anxiety in young people. In: Pilot & Feasibility Studies. 2016 ; Vol. 2.
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AU - Creswell, Cathy

AU - Newton, Tim

AU - Stevens, Katherine

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AU - Prasad, Suneeta

AU - Kirby, Jennifer

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N1 - We would like to thank the patients and patient representatives who contributed to the design of the study. This paper presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) Programme (Grant Reference Number PB-PG-1111-26029). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health.

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N2 - BackgroundChildhood dental anxiety is very common, with 10–20 % of children and young people reporting high levels of dental anxiety. It is distressing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of young people and their parents as well as being associated with poor oral health. Affected individuals may develop a lifelong reliance on general anaesthetic or sedation for necessary dental treatment thus requiring the support of specialist dental services. Children and young people with dental anxiety therefore require additional clinical time and can be costly to treat in the long term. The reduction of dental anxiety through the use of effective psychological techniques is, therefore, of high importance. However, there is a lack of high-quality research investigating the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches when applied to young people’s dental anxiety.Methods/designThe first part of the study will develop a profile of dentally anxious young people using a prospective questionnaire sent to a consecutive sample of 100 young people referred to the Paediatric Dentistry Department, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, in Sheffield. The second part will involve interviewing a purposive sample of 15–20 dental team members on their perceptions of a CBT self-help resource for dental anxiety, their opinions on whether they might use such a resource with patients, and their willingness to recruit participants to a future randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the resource. The third part of the study will investigate the most appropriate outcome measures to include in a trial, the acceptability of the resource, and retention and completion rates of treatment with a sample of 60 dentally anxious young people using the CBT resource.DiscussionThis study will provide information on the profile of dentally anxious young people who could potentially be helped by a guided self-help CBT resource. It will gain the perceptions of dental care team members of guided self-help CBT for dental anxiety in young people and their willingness to recruit participants to a trial. Acceptability of the resource to participants and retention and completion rates will also be investigated to inform a future RCT.

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