Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight

M S Indredavik, T Vik, S Heyerdahl, S Kulseng, Peter Fayers, A M Brubakk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

197 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders associated with low birth weight.

Design/study groups: A population based follow up study of 56 very low birthweight (VLBW: birth weight less than or equal to1500 g), 60 term small for gestational age (SGA: birth weight <10th centile), and 83 term control (birth weight &GE;10th centile) children at 14 years of age.

Outcome measures: Schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school aged children, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV, autism spectrum screening questionnaire, and children's global assessment scale.

Results: VLBW adolescents had a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (46%) than controls (13%) (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 13.0) and more psychiatric disorders (25%) than controls (7%) (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.5 to 12.0), especially anxiety disorders. Although 25% of the VLBW adolescents had attention problems, ADHD was diagnosed in only 7%.. Four VLBW adolescents had symptoms of Asperger's disorder, and the VLBW group had a higher sum score than controls on the, autism spectrum screening questionnaire. Although more SGA adolescents had psychiatric symptoms than controls (23% v 13%), the difference was not statistically significant. Results remained essentially the same when adolescents with low estimated intelligence quotient were excluded, and persisted after possible psychosocial confounders had been controlled for.

Conclusion: VLBW, but not SGA adolescents, have a high risk of developing psychiatric symptoms and disorders by the age of 14, especially attention deficit, anxiety symptoms, and relational problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)F445-F450
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume89
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • FOR-GESTATIONAL-AGE
  • BEHAVIORAL-ADJUSTMENT
  • INFANTILE-AUTISM
  • CHILDREN BORN
  • CEREBRAL MRI
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • OUTCOMES
  • SCHOOL
  • GROWTH

Cite this

Indredavik, M. S., Vik, T., Heyerdahl, S., Kulseng, S., Fayers, P., & Brubakk, A. M. (2004). Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 89(5), F445-F450. https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2003.038943

Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight. / Indredavik, M S ; Vik, T ; Heyerdahl, S ; Kulseng, S ; Fayers, Peter; Brubakk, A M .

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol. 89, No. 5, 2004, p. F445-F450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Indredavik, MS, Vik, T, Heyerdahl, S, Kulseng, S, Fayers, P & Brubakk, AM 2004, 'Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight', Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 89, no. 5, pp. F445-F450. https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2003.038943
Indredavik, M S ; Vik, T ; Heyerdahl, S ; Kulseng, S ; Fayers, Peter ; Brubakk, A M . / Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight. In: Archives of Disease in Childhood. 2004 ; Vol. 89, No. 5. pp. F445-F450.
@article{3aed7eee7b4f49a2b03a18e91393ac22,
title = "Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders associated with low birth weight.Design/study groups: A population based follow up study of 56 very low birthweight (VLBW: birth weight less than or equal to1500 g), 60 term small for gestational age (SGA: birth weight <10th centile), and 83 term control (birth weight &GE;10th centile) children at 14 years of age.Outcome measures: Schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school aged children, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV, autism spectrum screening questionnaire, and children's global assessment scale.Results: VLBW adolescents had a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (46{\%}) than controls (13{\%}) (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 13.0) and more psychiatric disorders (25{\%}) than controls (7{\%}) (OR 4.3, 95{\%} CI 1.5 to 12.0), especially anxiety disorders. Although 25{\%} of the VLBW adolescents had attention problems, ADHD was diagnosed in only 7{\%}.. Four VLBW adolescents had symptoms of Asperger's disorder, and the VLBW group had a higher sum score than controls on the, autism spectrum screening questionnaire. Although more SGA adolescents had psychiatric symptoms than controls (23{\%} v 13{\%}), the difference was not statistically significant. Results remained essentially the same when adolescents with low estimated intelligence quotient were excluded, and persisted after possible psychosocial confounders had been controlled for.Conclusion: VLBW, but not SGA adolescents, have a high risk of developing psychiatric symptoms and disorders by the age of 14, especially attention deficit, anxiety symptoms, and relational problems.",
keywords = "FOR-GESTATIONAL-AGE, BEHAVIORAL-ADJUSTMENT, INFANTILE-AUTISM, CHILDREN BORN, CEREBRAL MRI, RISK-FACTORS, FOLLOW-UP, OUTCOMES, SCHOOL, GROWTH",
author = "Indredavik, {M S} and T Vik and S Heyerdahl and S Kulseng and Peter Fayers and Brubakk, {A M}",
note = "ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank the teenagers themselves, their parents and teachers for their cooperation and interest in the study. We also thank the child and adolescent psychiatrists Mari Jordet Bruheim and Sigrun Opsal Vilsvik for performing interviews and diagnostic reassessment work, physiotherapist Kari Anne I Evensen for assistance with the manuscript, and paediatrician Jon Skranes for valuable research advice.",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1136/adc.2003.038943",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "F445--F450",
journal = "Archives of Disease in Childhood",
issn = "0003-9888",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in adolescents with low birth weight

AU - Indredavik, M S

AU - Vik, T

AU - Heyerdahl, S

AU - Kulseng, S

AU - Fayers, Peter

AU - Brubakk, A M

N1 - ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank the teenagers themselves, their parents and teachers for their cooperation and interest in the study. We also thank the child and adolescent psychiatrists Mari Jordet Bruheim and Sigrun Opsal Vilsvik for performing interviews and diagnostic reassessment work, physiotherapist Kari Anne I Evensen for assistance with the manuscript, and paediatrician Jon Skranes for valuable research advice.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders associated with low birth weight.Design/study groups: A population based follow up study of 56 very low birthweight (VLBW: birth weight less than or equal to1500 g), 60 term small for gestational age (SGA: birth weight <10th centile), and 83 term control (birth weight &GE;10th centile) children at 14 years of age.Outcome measures: Schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school aged children, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV, autism spectrum screening questionnaire, and children's global assessment scale.Results: VLBW adolescents had a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (46%) than controls (13%) (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 13.0) and more psychiatric disorders (25%) than controls (7%) (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.5 to 12.0), especially anxiety disorders. Although 25% of the VLBW adolescents had attention problems, ADHD was diagnosed in only 7%.. Four VLBW adolescents had symptoms of Asperger's disorder, and the VLBW group had a higher sum score than controls on the, autism spectrum screening questionnaire. Although more SGA adolescents had psychiatric symptoms than controls (23% v 13%), the difference was not statistically significant. Results remained essentially the same when adolescents with low estimated intelligence quotient were excluded, and persisted after possible psychosocial confounders had been controlled for.Conclusion: VLBW, but not SGA adolescents, have a high risk of developing psychiatric symptoms and disorders by the age of 14, especially attention deficit, anxiety symptoms, and relational problems.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders associated with low birth weight.Design/study groups: A population based follow up study of 56 very low birthweight (VLBW: birth weight less than or equal to1500 g), 60 term small for gestational age (SGA: birth weight <10th centile), and 83 term control (birth weight &GE;10th centile) children at 14 years of age.Outcome measures: Schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school aged children, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale IV, autism spectrum screening questionnaire, and children's global assessment scale.Results: VLBW adolescents had a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms (46%) than controls (13%) (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 13.0) and more psychiatric disorders (25%) than controls (7%) (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.5 to 12.0), especially anxiety disorders. Although 25% of the VLBW adolescents had attention problems, ADHD was diagnosed in only 7%.. Four VLBW adolescents had symptoms of Asperger's disorder, and the VLBW group had a higher sum score than controls on the, autism spectrum screening questionnaire. Although more SGA adolescents had psychiatric symptoms than controls (23% v 13%), the difference was not statistically significant. Results remained essentially the same when adolescents with low estimated intelligence quotient were excluded, and persisted after possible psychosocial confounders had been controlled for.Conclusion: VLBW, but not SGA adolescents, have a high risk of developing psychiatric symptoms and disorders by the age of 14, especially attention deficit, anxiety symptoms, and relational problems.

KW - FOR-GESTATIONAL-AGE

KW - BEHAVIORAL-ADJUSTMENT

KW - INFANTILE-AUTISM

KW - CHILDREN BORN

KW - CEREBRAL MRI

KW - RISK-FACTORS

KW - FOLLOW-UP

KW - OUTCOMES

KW - SCHOOL

KW - GROWTH

U2 - 10.1136/adc.2003.038943

DO - 10.1136/adc.2003.038943

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - F445-F450

JO - Archives of Disease in Childhood

JF - Archives of Disease in Childhood

SN - 0003-9888

IS - 5

ER -