Public opinion on systems for feeding back views to the National Health Service

Vikki Entwistle, J. E. Andrew, M. J. Emslie, Kim Walker, Catherine Dorrian, Valerie Christine Angus, Anna Olivia Conniff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To explore public opinions about different systems for feeding back views about health services to the National Health Service.

Design: Questionnaire survey.

Setting: NHS Grampian, Scotland, UK.

Participants: A random sample of 10 000 adults registered with a general practitioner in Grampian was invited to opt in to the study; 2449 were sent questionnaires.

Outcome measures: Opinions about different feedback mechanisms and their likely effectiveness in three scenarios; reasons for preferring particular mechanisms.

Results: Of 1951 respondents, over 80% thought patient representatives would be a good way for people to pass on their ideas about the NHS and would help to improve it. Patient representatives were the most widely preferred course of action for two out of three scenarios. People explained their preferences for particular feedback systems mainly in terms of their ease of use, the perception that they would be listened to, and the likelihood of anything being done about what they said. However, people varied in their judgements about the likely effectiveness of different feedback systems. Preferences for particular systems varied according to the types of situation considered. Some people are reluctant to approach clinical staff with concerns about healthcare quality. A substantial minority have no confidence that their concerns would be listened to or acted upon, however they were expressed.

Conclusion: The "patient representative" function has substantial popular support and could facilitate local learning and action to improve the quality of health services from users' perspectives. Feedback systems must demonstrate their effectiveness if they are to gain and retain public confidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-442
Number of pages7
JournalQuality & safety in health care
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • QUALITY
  • CARE

Cite this

Entwistle, V., Andrew, J. E., Emslie, M. J., Walker, K., Dorrian, C., Angus, V. C., & Conniff, A. O. (2003). Public opinion on systems for feeding back views to the National Health Service. Quality & safety in health care, 12(6), 435-442. https://doi.org/10.1136/qhc.12.6.435

Public opinion on systems for feeding back views to the National Health Service. / Entwistle, Vikki; Andrew, J. E.; Emslie, M. J.; Walker, Kim; Dorrian, Catherine; Angus, Valerie Christine; Conniff, Anna Olivia.

In: Quality & safety in health care, Vol. 12, No. 6, 2003, p. 435-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Entwistle, V, Andrew, JE, Emslie, MJ, Walker, K, Dorrian, C, Angus, VC & Conniff, AO 2003, 'Public opinion on systems for feeding back views to the National Health Service', Quality & safety in health care, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 435-442. https://doi.org/10.1136/qhc.12.6.435
Entwistle, Vikki ; Andrew, J. E. ; Emslie, M. J. ; Walker, Kim ; Dorrian, Catherine ; Angus, Valerie Christine ; Conniff, Anna Olivia. / Public opinion on systems for feeding back views to the National Health Service. In: Quality & safety in health care. 2003 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 435-442.
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