Public risk perception of non-prescription medicines and information disclosure during consultations

a suitable target for intervention?

Shona Fielding, Paul Slovic, Marie Johnston, Amanda J Lee, Christine M Bond, Margaret C Watson (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Optimisation of non-prescription medicine (NPM) supply from community pharmacies could reduce demand on other healthcare providers, including general practitioners and emergency department personnel. Outcomes can be maximised if patients disclose relevant information, for example concomitant medication, during pharmacy-based consultations. Strategies to promote information disclosure are needed. This study used the psychometric paradigm of risk to explore whether the public's risk perception of NPMs was associated with information disclosure.

METHODS: This national, cross-sectional population study used a random sample of 3000 adults (aged ≥ 18 years) from the Scottish Electoral register. Postal questionnaires collected data on risk perceptions, information disclosure and demographic information. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine constructs to which the risk questions could be grouped. Factors were scored and the scores compared across demographics.

KEY FINDINGS: Just over half (57%) of the 927 respondents perceived NPMs to be associated with low general risk. For 19 of the 23 statements (83%), respondents indicated general agreement, that is low-risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception of NPMs were less likely to disclose information during consultations compared with respondents with lower risk perception.

CONCLUSION: There is general low public risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception are less likely to disclose information. Interventions that raise risk perception are unlikely to enhance the safe and effective supply of NPMs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-432
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume26
Issue number5
Early online date10 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Public risks
Risk perception
Disclosure
Referral and Consultation
Factor analysis
Demography
Pharmacies
Personnel
Psychometrics
Health Personnel
General Practitioners
Statistical Factor Analysis
Hospital Emergency Service

Keywords

  • health knowledge
  • self-care
  • risk assessment
  • non-prescription drugs
  • self-medication

Cite this

@article{e516be132f22425285dcacc41d3e576d,
title = "Public risk perception of non-prescription medicines and information disclosure during consultations: a suitable target for intervention?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Optimisation of non-prescription medicine (NPM) supply from community pharmacies could reduce demand on other healthcare providers, including general practitioners and emergency department personnel. Outcomes can be maximised if patients disclose relevant information, for example concomitant medication, during pharmacy-based consultations. Strategies to promote information disclosure are needed. This study used the psychometric paradigm of risk to explore whether the public's risk perception of NPMs was associated with information disclosure.METHODS: This national, cross-sectional population study used a random sample of 3000 adults (aged ≥ 18 years) from the Scottish Electoral register. Postal questionnaires collected data on risk perceptions, information disclosure and demographic information. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine constructs to which the risk questions could be grouped. Factors were scored and the scores compared across demographics.KEY FINDINGS: Just over half (57{\%}) of the 927 respondents perceived NPMs to be associated with low general risk. For 19 of the 23 statements (83{\%}), respondents indicated general agreement, that is low-risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception of NPMs were less likely to disclose information during consultations compared with respondents with lower risk perception.CONCLUSION: There is general low public risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception are less likely to disclose information. Interventions that raise risk perception are unlikely to enhance the safe and effective supply of NPMs.",
keywords = "health knowledge, self-care, risk assessment, non-prescription drugs, self-medication",
author = "Shona Fielding and Paul Slovic and Marie Johnston and Lee, {Amanda J} and Bond, {Christine M} and Watson, {Margaret C}",
note = "This work was supported by the Chief Scientist Office, Scottish Executive Health Department (CZH/4/376). The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and may not represent the views of the funding organisation.",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ijpp.12433",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "423--432",
journal = "International Journal of Pharmacy Practice",
issn = "0961-7671",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111)",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public risk perception of non-prescription medicines and information disclosure during consultations

T2 - a suitable target for intervention?

AU - Fielding, Shona

AU - Slovic, Paul

AU - Johnston, Marie

AU - Lee, Amanda J

AU - Bond, Christine M

AU - Watson, Margaret C

N1 - This work was supported by the Chief Scientist Office, Scottish Executive Health Department (CZH/4/376). The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and may not represent the views of the funding organisation.

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Optimisation of non-prescription medicine (NPM) supply from community pharmacies could reduce demand on other healthcare providers, including general practitioners and emergency department personnel. Outcomes can be maximised if patients disclose relevant information, for example concomitant medication, during pharmacy-based consultations. Strategies to promote information disclosure are needed. This study used the psychometric paradigm of risk to explore whether the public's risk perception of NPMs was associated with information disclosure.METHODS: This national, cross-sectional population study used a random sample of 3000 adults (aged ≥ 18 years) from the Scottish Electoral register. Postal questionnaires collected data on risk perceptions, information disclosure and demographic information. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine constructs to which the risk questions could be grouped. Factors were scored and the scores compared across demographics.KEY FINDINGS: Just over half (57%) of the 927 respondents perceived NPMs to be associated with low general risk. For 19 of the 23 statements (83%), respondents indicated general agreement, that is low-risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception of NPMs were less likely to disclose information during consultations compared with respondents with lower risk perception.CONCLUSION: There is general low public risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception are less likely to disclose information. Interventions that raise risk perception are unlikely to enhance the safe and effective supply of NPMs.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Optimisation of non-prescription medicine (NPM) supply from community pharmacies could reduce demand on other healthcare providers, including general practitioners and emergency department personnel. Outcomes can be maximised if patients disclose relevant information, for example concomitant medication, during pharmacy-based consultations. Strategies to promote information disclosure are needed. This study used the psychometric paradigm of risk to explore whether the public's risk perception of NPMs was associated with information disclosure.METHODS: This national, cross-sectional population study used a random sample of 3000 adults (aged ≥ 18 years) from the Scottish Electoral register. Postal questionnaires collected data on risk perceptions, information disclosure and demographic information. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine constructs to which the risk questions could be grouped. Factors were scored and the scores compared across demographics.KEY FINDINGS: Just over half (57%) of the 927 respondents perceived NPMs to be associated with low general risk. For 19 of the 23 statements (83%), respondents indicated general agreement, that is low-risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception of NPMs were less likely to disclose information during consultations compared with respondents with lower risk perception.CONCLUSION: There is general low public risk perception of NPMs. Individuals with higher risk perception are less likely to disclose information. Interventions that raise risk perception are unlikely to enhance the safe and effective supply of NPMs.

KW - health knowledge

KW - self-care

KW - risk assessment

KW - non-prescription drugs

KW - self-medication

U2 - 10.1111/ijpp.12433

DO - 10.1111/ijpp.12433

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 423

EP - 432

JO - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

JF - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

SN - 0961-7671

IS - 5

ER -