Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial

M. S. Jordhøy, Peter Fayers, J. H. Loge, M. Ahlner-Elmqvist, S. Kaasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the impact of comprehensive palliative care on patients' quality of life. The intervention was based on cooperation between a palliative medicine unit and the community service and was compared with conventional care.

Patients and Methods: A cluster randomized trial was carried out, with community health care districts defined as the clusters. Patients from these districts who had malignant disease and survival expectancy between 2 to 9 months were entered onto the trial. The main quality-of-life end points were physical and emotional functioning, pain, and psychologic distress assessed monthly by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaire and Impact of Event scale (IES). In total, 235 intervention patients and 199 controls were included.

Results: During the initial 4 months of follow-up, the compliance was good (72%) and comparable among treatment groups. No significant differences on any of the quality-of-life scores were found. At later assessments and for scores that were made within 3 months before death, there was also no consistent tendency in favor of any treatment group on the main outcomes or other EORTC QLQ-C30 scales/items.

Conclusion: A general program of palliative care may be important to ensure flexibility and to meet the needs of terminally ill patients. However, to achieve improvements on a group level of the various dimensions of quality of life, specific interventions directed toward specific symptoms or problems may have to be defined, evaluated, and included in the program. J Clin Oncol 19:3884-3894. (C) 2001 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3884-3894
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume19
Issue number15
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2001

Keywords

  • OF-LIFE
  • TERMINALLY ILL
  • HOME CARE
  • COST-EFFECTIVENESS
  • EVENT SCALE
  • IMPACT
  • POPULATION
  • SERVICE
  • DEATH
  • INTERVENTIONS

Cite this

Jordhøy, M. S., Fayers, P., Loge, J. H., Ahlner-Elmqvist, M., & Kaasa, S. (2001). Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 19(15), 3884-3894.

Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial. / Jordhøy, M. S.; Fayers, Peter; Loge, J. H.; Ahlner-Elmqvist, M.; Kaasa, S.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 19, No. 15, 09.2001, p. 3884-3894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jordhøy, MS, Fayers, P, Loge, JH, Ahlner-Elmqvist, M & Kaasa, S 2001, 'Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 19, no. 15, pp. 3884-3894.
Jordhøy MS, Fayers P, Loge JH, Ahlner-Elmqvist M, Kaasa S. Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2001 Sep;19(15):3884-3894.
Jordhøy, M. S. ; Fayers, Peter ; Loge, J. H. ; Ahlner-Elmqvist, M. ; Kaasa, S. / Quality of life in palliative cancer care. Results from a cluster randomized trial. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2001 ; Vol. 19, No. 15. pp. 3884-3894.
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