Quality of life in the five years after intensive care

a cohort study

Brian Cuthbertson, Sian Roughton, David James Jenkinson, Graeme Stewart MacLennan, Luke David Vale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

205 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Data on quality of life beyond 2 years after intensive care discharge are limited and we aimed to explore this area further. Our objective was to quantify quality of life and health utilities in the 5 years after intensive care discharge. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal cohort study in a University Hospital in the UK. Quality of life was assessed from the period before ICU admission until 5 years and quality adjusted life years calculated. RESULTS: 300 level 3 intensive care patients of median age 60.5 years and median length of stay 6.7 days, were recruited. Physical quality of life fell to 3 months (P = 0.003), rose back to pre-morbid levels at 12 months then fell again from 2.5 to 5 years after intensive care (P = 0.002). Mean physical scores were below the population norm at all time points but the mean mental scores after 6 months were similar to those population norms. The utility value measured using the EuroQOL-5D quality of life assessment tool (EQ-5D) at 5 years was 0.677. During the five years after intensive care unit, the cumulative quality adjusted life years were significantly lower than that expected for the general population (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Intensive care unit admission is associated with a high mortality, a poor physical quality of life and a low quality adjusted life years gained compared to the general population for 5 years after discharge. In this group, critical illness associated with ICU admission should be treated as a life time diagnosis with associated excess mortality, morbidity and the requirement for ongoing health care support.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberR6
JournalCritical Care
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2010

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Critical Care
Cohort Studies
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Population
Intensive Care Units
Mortality
Critical Illness
Longitudinal Studies
Length of Stay
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Health

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Cuthbertson, B., Roughton, S., Jenkinson, D. J., MacLennan, G. S., & Vale, L. D. (2010). Quality of life in the five years after intensive care: a cohort study. Critical Care, 14(1), [R6]. https://doi.org/10.1186/cc8848

Quality of life in the five years after intensive care : a cohort study. / Cuthbertson, Brian; Roughton, Sian; Jenkinson, David James; MacLennan, Graeme Stewart; Vale, Luke David.

In: Critical Care, Vol. 14, No. 1, R6, 20.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cuthbertson, B, Roughton, S, Jenkinson, DJ, MacLennan, GS & Vale, LD 2010, 'Quality of life in the five years after intensive care: a cohort study', Critical Care, vol. 14, no. 1, R6. https://doi.org/10.1186/cc8848
Cuthbertson, Brian ; Roughton, Sian ; Jenkinson, David James ; MacLennan, Graeme Stewart ; Vale, Luke David. / Quality of life in the five years after intensive care : a cohort study. In: Critical Care. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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