Recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth

A systematic review and meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

Background Stillbirth remains a significant problem worldwide. Unexplained stillbirth is the most common classification of cause of death accounting for between 10–70%. Studies that investigate recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth yield inconsistent results.

Objective To investigate the association between unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy and recurrence risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy in high-income countries.

Methods Six databases were searched using a comprehensive search strategy to identify relevant cohort and case-control studies. No publication status, language or date restrictions were applied. Internet resources and reference lists of relevant papers were also searched. Using explicit a priori criteria two reviewers independently screened titles to identify eligible studies, extract data and assess methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to combine results of included studies.

Results Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review fifteen of which were considered eligible for the meta-analysis. Stillbirth and unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous stillbirth were 4.75(3.74, 6.03) and 2.34(1.53, 3.57) respectively. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled adjusted OR of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous unexplained stillbirth was 1.83(1.38, 2.44)

Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis provides some evidence to support an increased recurrence risk for unexplained stillbirth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)A153
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Volume99
Issue numberSuppl. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Stillbirth
Meta-Analysis
Recurrence
Pregnancy
Live Birth
Odds Ratio
Internet
Publications
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Language

Cite this

@article{92f13c9e2c034b83bece5a52051c72f9,
title = "Recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background Stillbirth remains a significant problem worldwide. Unexplained stillbirth is the most common classification of cause of death accounting for between 10–70{\%}. Studies that investigate recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth yield inconsistent results.Objective To investigate the association between unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy and recurrence risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy in high-income countries.Methods Six databases were searched using a comprehensive search strategy to identify relevant cohort and case-control studies. No publication status, language or date restrictions were applied. Internet resources and reference lists of relevant papers were also searched. Using explicit a priori criteria two reviewers independently screened titles to identify eligible studies, extract data and assess methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to combine results of included studies.Results Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review fifteen of which were considered eligible for the meta-analysis. Stillbirth and unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous stillbirth were 4.75(3.74, 6.03) and 2.34(1.53, 3.57) respectively. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled adjusted OR of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous unexplained stillbirth was 1.83(1.38, 2.44)Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis provides some evidence to support an increased recurrence risk for unexplained stillbirth.",
author = "KA Lamont and S Bhattacharya and GT Jones and NW Scott",
note = "Poster",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1136/archdischild-2014-306576.450",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "A153",
journal = "Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition",
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number = "Suppl. 1",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Lamont, KA

AU - Bhattacharya, S

AU - Jones, GT

AU - Scott, NW

N1 - Poster

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background Stillbirth remains a significant problem worldwide. Unexplained stillbirth is the most common classification of cause of death accounting for between 10–70%. Studies that investigate recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth yield inconsistent results.Objective To investigate the association between unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy and recurrence risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy in high-income countries.Methods Six databases were searched using a comprehensive search strategy to identify relevant cohort and case-control studies. No publication status, language or date restrictions were applied. Internet resources and reference lists of relevant papers were also searched. Using explicit a priori criteria two reviewers independently screened titles to identify eligible studies, extract data and assess methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to combine results of included studies.Results Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review fifteen of which were considered eligible for the meta-analysis. Stillbirth and unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous stillbirth were 4.75(3.74, 6.03) and 2.34(1.53, 3.57) respectively. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled adjusted OR of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous unexplained stillbirth was 1.83(1.38, 2.44)Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis provides some evidence to support an increased recurrence risk for unexplained stillbirth.

AB - Background Stillbirth remains a significant problem worldwide. Unexplained stillbirth is the most common classification of cause of death accounting for between 10–70%. Studies that investigate recurrence risk of unexplained stillbirth yield inconsistent results.Objective To investigate the association between unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy and recurrence risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy in high-income countries.Methods Six databases were searched using a comprehensive search strategy to identify relevant cohort and case-control studies. No publication status, language or date restrictions were applied. Internet resources and reference lists of relevant papers were also searched. Using explicit a priori criteria two reviewers independently screened titles to identify eligible studies, extract data and assess methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to combine results of included studies.Results Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review fifteen of which were considered eligible for the meta-analysis. Stillbirth and unexplained stillbirth in a first pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous stillbirth were 4.75(3.74, 6.03) and 2.34(1.53, 3.57) respectively. Compared with women who had a live birth in a first pregnancy the pooled adjusted OR of stillbirth recurrence for women with a previous unexplained stillbirth was 1.83(1.38, 2.44)Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis provides some evidence to support an increased recurrence risk for unexplained stillbirth.

U2 - 10.1136/archdischild-2014-306576.450

DO - 10.1136/archdischild-2014-306576.450

M3 - Abstract

VL - 99

SP - A153

JO - Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition

JF - Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition

SN - 1359-2998

IS - Suppl. 1

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