Rejecting the demise of vertical-banded gastroplasty

A long-term single-institute experience

Mohamed Bekheit* (Corresponding Author), Khaled Katri, Wael Nabil Abdel Salam, Tarek Ezzat, El Said El Kayal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical interventions have proven to be more effective than other measures in the treatment of morbid obesity. The short-term outcomes of the various surgical interventions have been well documented in the literature, with fewer reports on long-term outcomes. The reported long-term outcome of the vertical-banded gastroplasty (VBG) is conflicting. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our long-term experience with VBG. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was conducted. Records of patients who underwent VBG five or more years ago were retrieved. An analysis of the long-term weight changes and reported complications was conducted. The study included 150 patients: 43 males (29 %) and 107 females (71 %). Their mean age was 30 years old (12-53), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 47 ± 8.4 kg/m2. Patients were followed up for an average of 8 years (5-11). More than 60 % of patients had good long-term weight loss (EWL > 50 %). A significant negative correlation was found between the excess weight loss percent (EWL%) and the pre-operative BMI (p < 0.05). The differences in EWL% between males and females were not significant (p = 0.061). Nevertheless, the change in EWL% over time for both males and females was significant (p = 0.004). Revision surgery was required in seven patients (4.7 %). Five patients had conversion of VBG to gastric bypass (3.3 %), while two patients (1.3 %) had reversal of the procedure. Late complications included mesh erosion in three cases, staple line dehiscence in two patients, and stomal stenosis in six patients. VBG could be a long-term effective intervention for the treatment of morbid obesity. Good selection is the cornerstone for long-term success. Late complication rate is acceptable after VBG. VBG is a specifically useful tool under stringent financial circumstances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1604-1610
Number of pages7
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume23
Issue number10
Early online date30 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Fingerprint

Gastroplasty
Weight Loss
Morbid Obesity
Body Mass Index
Gastric Bypass
Reoperation
Pathologic Constriction
Databases
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Long term
  • Obesity
  • VBG

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Rejecting the demise of vertical-banded gastroplasty : A long-term single-institute experience. / Bekheit, Mohamed (Corresponding Author); Katri, Khaled; Salam, Wael Nabil Abdel; Ezzat, Tarek; El Kayal, El Said.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 10, 10.2013, p. 1604-1610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bekheit, Mohamed ; Katri, Khaled ; Salam, Wael Nabil Abdel ; Ezzat, Tarek ; El Kayal, El Said. / Rejecting the demise of vertical-banded gastroplasty : A long-term single-institute experience. In: Obesity Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 10. pp. 1604-1610.
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