Religious Involvement and Self-Perceived Spiritual Health: A Quantitative Study of Canadian Children with Disabilities

Valerie Michaelson*, John Swinton, Nathan King, William Pickett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study presents a national analysis of 24,190 young Canadians in which relationships between religious group involvement and the spiritual health of children with and without disabilities is described. Two key findings emerged: 1) Children who report religious involvement report higher self-rated importance of spiritual health compared with non-involved peers; 2) among involved children, spiritual health was rated as less important among three groups of young people in particular: those with multiple disabilities, those with a learning exceptionality and those with behavioural disorders. Implications for inclusive ministry are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-392
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Disability and Religion
Volume24
Issue number4
Early online date17 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • church
  • disability
  • pediatrics
  • spiritual health
  • spirituality

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