Religious involvement, conventional Christian, and unconventional nonmaterialist beliefs

Tony Glendinning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses a Scottish national sample to examine the relationship between church involvement, religious socialization among nonattenders, orthodox Christian beliefs, and a variety of unconventional nonmaterialist beliefs. Greater conventional religious belief is strongly associated with supposed alternatives but nonetheless, nonattenders are more likely to believe in the unconventional over and above any enduring sympathy they may hold for Christian doctrine. One group in particular stands out: belief remains high among nonattenders who once went to services regularly and seriously contemplate reengaging with organized religion. The article discusses the importance of these findings for "believing but not belonging."

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)585-595
Number of pages10
JournalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Volume45
Issue number4
Early online date22 Nov 2006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

Cite this

Religious involvement, conventional Christian, and unconventional nonmaterialist beliefs. / Glendinning, Tony.

In: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Vol. 45, No. 4, 12.2006, p. 585-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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