Religious policy and state control in Tibet: Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3

Martin Mills, Ronald Scrimgeour (Collaborator)

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned Report

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Abstract

Since 1950, the government of the Peoples¿ Republic of China has sought to control the dominant Buddhist religion and its leadership in Tibet as a means to ensure the integration and security of Tibetan regions within China. The age of the present Dalai Lama and the question of a possible future re-incarnation brings these issues to the fore. It is likely that the Chinese government and Tibetan government-in-exile will declare separate candidates for the Dalai Lama's re-incarnation. Such a dispute may precipitate large-scale violent unrest across the Tibetan cultural area with potentially grave human rights implications for those involved.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherScottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameScottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers
Volume3

Fingerprint

religious policy
Tibet
government supervision
parliament
government-in-exile
China
human rights
candidacy
Group
Religion
leadership
present

Cite this

Mills, M., & Scrimgeour, R. (2010). Religious policy and state control in Tibet: Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3. (Scottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers; Vol. 3). Scottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet.

Religious policy and state control in Tibet : Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3. / Mills, Martin; Scrimgeour, Ronald (Collaborator).

Scottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet, 2010. 6 p. (Scottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers; Vol. 3).

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned Report

Mills, M & Scrimgeour, R 2010, Religious policy and state control in Tibet: Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3. Scottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers, vol. 3, Scottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet.
Mills M, Scrimgeour R. Religious policy and state control in Tibet: Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3. Scottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet, 2010. 6 p. (Scottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers).
Mills, Martin ; Scrimgeour, Ronald. / Religious policy and state control in Tibet : Scottish Parliament cross-party group on Tibet, briefing paper 3. Scottish Parliament's Cross Party Group on Tibet, 2010. 6 p. (Scottish Parliament's Cross-Party Group on Tibet Briefing Papers).
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