Revisiting the semi-consociational model: Democratic failure in prewar Lebanon and post-invasion Iraq

Eduardo Wassim Aboultaif*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article revisits the concept of semi-consociational democracy and distinguishes it from full consociationalism. Semi-consociationalism features just two of the characteristics of full consociationalism, proportionality and segmental autonomy, and exists without strong grand coalitions and veto powers. The case studies of prewar Lebanon and post-invasion Iraq demonstrate this new category of power sharing, which relies on three conditions: concentration of executive powers in the presidential office (prewar Lebanon) or premiership (post-invasion Iraq), communal hegemony in the system, and communal control over the armed forces. Full consociationalism then is mistakenly blamed for democratic failure in these two case studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-123
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Political Science Review
Volume41
Issue number1
Early online date24 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • armed forces
  • consociationalism
  • executive
  • hegemony
  • post-invasion Iraq
  • Prewar Lebanon
  • semi-consociationalism

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