Runoff processes, streamwater residence times and controlling landscape characteristics in a mesoscale catchment: an initial assessment.

Christopher Soulsby, Doerthe Tetzlaff, P. Rodgers, S. Dunn, S. Waldron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tracer studies, using Gran alkalinity and 6180, in nested sub-basins of the 230 km(2) Feshie catchment in the Cairngorm mountains, Scotland, were used to characterise hydrology in terms of groundwater contributions to annual runoff and mean residence times. Relationships between these fundamental hydrological descriptors and catchment characteristics were explored with the use of a GIS. Catchment soil distribution-mapped by the UK's Hydrology Of Soil Type (HOST) digital data base-exerted the strongest influence on flow path partitioning and mean residence times. Smallest groundwater contributions (similar to 30-40%) and shortest residence times (similar to 2-5 months) were observed in catchments dominated by peat and/or shallow alpine soils and bedrock. Longer residence times (similar to 12-15 months) and greater groundwater contributions (similar to 45-55%) were observed in catchments dominated by more freely draining podzolic, sub-alpine and alluvial soils. These different subcatchment responses were integrated to give intermediate residence times (similar to 6 months) at the catchment outfall. The influence of catchment topography and scale appeared to be largely mediated by their influence on soil cover and distribution. The study illustrates the potential utility of integrating digital landscape analysis with tracer studies to understand the hydrological functioning of mesoscale catchments. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-221
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Hydrology
Volume325
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • flow paths
  • groundwater
  • mean residence times
  • soil hydrology
  • landscape organisation
  • HOST
  • SUB-ARCTIC CATCHMENT
  • DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES
  • TRACER-BASED ASSESSMENT
  • ALLT-A-MHARCAIDH
  • HYDROGRAPH SEPARATIONS
  • CAIRNGORM MOUNTAINS
  • FLOW PATHS
  • HYDROLOGICAL PATHWAYS
  • CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
  • SCOTTISH CATCHMENT

Cite this

@article{cdc0b1d282464b68b0baea78af30b95a,
title = "Runoff processes, streamwater residence times and controlling landscape characteristics in a mesoscale catchment: an initial assessment.",
abstract = "Tracer studies, using Gran alkalinity and 6180, in nested sub-basins of the 230 km(2) Feshie catchment in the Cairngorm mountains, Scotland, were used to characterise hydrology in terms of groundwater contributions to annual runoff and mean residence times. Relationships between these fundamental hydrological descriptors and catchment characteristics were explored with the use of a GIS. Catchment soil distribution-mapped by the UK's Hydrology Of Soil Type (HOST) digital data base-exerted the strongest influence on flow path partitioning and mean residence times. Smallest groundwater contributions (similar to 30-40{\%}) and shortest residence times (similar to 2-5 months) were observed in catchments dominated by peat and/or shallow alpine soils and bedrock. Longer residence times (similar to 12-15 months) and greater groundwater contributions (similar to 45-55{\%}) were observed in catchments dominated by more freely draining podzolic, sub-alpine and alluvial soils. These different subcatchment responses were integrated to give intermediate residence times (similar to 6 months) at the catchment outfall. The influence of catchment topography and scale appeared to be largely mediated by their influence on soil cover and distribution. The study illustrates the potential utility of integrating digital landscape analysis with tracer studies to understand the hydrological functioning of mesoscale catchments. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "flow paths, groundwater, mean residence times, soil hydrology, landscape organisation, HOST, SUB-ARCTIC CATCHMENT, DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES, TRACER-BASED ASSESSMENT, ALLT-A-MHARCAIDH, HYDROGRAPH SEPARATIONS, CAIRNGORM MOUNTAINS, FLOW PATHS, HYDROLOGICAL PATHWAYS, CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT, SCOTTISH CATCHMENT",
author = "Christopher Soulsby and Doerthe Tetzlaff and P. Rodgers and S. Dunn and S. Waldron",
year = "2006",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.10.024",
language = "English",
volume = "325",
pages = "197--221",
journal = "Journal of Hydrology",
issn = "0022-1694",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B. V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Runoff processes, streamwater residence times and controlling landscape characteristics in a mesoscale catchment: an initial assessment.

AU - Soulsby, Christopher

AU - Tetzlaff, Doerthe

AU - Rodgers, P.

AU - Dunn, S.

AU - Waldron, S.

PY - 2006/6

Y1 - 2006/6

N2 - Tracer studies, using Gran alkalinity and 6180, in nested sub-basins of the 230 km(2) Feshie catchment in the Cairngorm mountains, Scotland, were used to characterise hydrology in terms of groundwater contributions to annual runoff and mean residence times. Relationships between these fundamental hydrological descriptors and catchment characteristics were explored with the use of a GIS. Catchment soil distribution-mapped by the UK's Hydrology Of Soil Type (HOST) digital data base-exerted the strongest influence on flow path partitioning and mean residence times. Smallest groundwater contributions (similar to 30-40%) and shortest residence times (similar to 2-5 months) were observed in catchments dominated by peat and/or shallow alpine soils and bedrock. Longer residence times (similar to 12-15 months) and greater groundwater contributions (similar to 45-55%) were observed in catchments dominated by more freely draining podzolic, sub-alpine and alluvial soils. These different subcatchment responses were integrated to give intermediate residence times (similar to 6 months) at the catchment outfall. The influence of catchment topography and scale appeared to be largely mediated by their influence on soil cover and distribution. The study illustrates the potential utility of integrating digital landscape analysis with tracer studies to understand the hydrological functioning of mesoscale catchments. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Tracer studies, using Gran alkalinity and 6180, in nested sub-basins of the 230 km(2) Feshie catchment in the Cairngorm mountains, Scotland, were used to characterise hydrology in terms of groundwater contributions to annual runoff and mean residence times. Relationships between these fundamental hydrological descriptors and catchment characteristics were explored with the use of a GIS. Catchment soil distribution-mapped by the UK's Hydrology Of Soil Type (HOST) digital data base-exerted the strongest influence on flow path partitioning and mean residence times. Smallest groundwater contributions (similar to 30-40%) and shortest residence times (similar to 2-5 months) were observed in catchments dominated by peat and/or shallow alpine soils and bedrock. Longer residence times (similar to 12-15 months) and greater groundwater contributions (similar to 45-55%) were observed in catchments dominated by more freely draining podzolic, sub-alpine and alluvial soils. These different subcatchment responses were integrated to give intermediate residence times (similar to 6 months) at the catchment outfall. The influence of catchment topography and scale appeared to be largely mediated by their influence on soil cover and distribution. The study illustrates the potential utility of integrating digital landscape analysis with tracer studies to understand the hydrological functioning of mesoscale catchments. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - flow paths

KW - groundwater

KW - mean residence times

KW - soil hydrology

KW - landscape organisation

KW - HOST

KW - SUB-ARCTIC CATCHMENT

KW - DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES

KW - TRACER-BASED ASSESSMENT

KW - ALLT-A-MHARCAIDH

KW - HYDROGRAPH SEPARATIONS

KW - CAIRNGORM MOUNTAINS

KW - FLOW PATHS

KW - HYDROLOGICAL PATHWAYS

KW - CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

KW - SCOTTISH CATCHMENT

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.10.024

DO - 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.10.024

M3 - Article

VL - 325

SP - 197

EP - 221

JO - Journal of Hydrology

JF - Journal of Hydrology

SN - 0022-1694

ER -