Rural Citizens' Rights to Accessible Health Services

An Exploration

John Hugh Farrington, Jane Farmer, Amy Nimegeer, Gaener Rodger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rural citizens protest about changes in their model of local health services provision, appealing to a concept of social justice for equivalence of accessibility to services. This article explores the areas where citizens perceive deficits in social justice regarding services and the extent to which their appeals might have support in law and government guidance. The article explores how asymmetric philosophies of resource allocation and interpretations of inclusion in decision-making process may underlie protest and concludes that, while policy rhetoric ignores constraints on citizen roles and choices in service design, protest will continue, as it is a manifestation of rural citizens' frustration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-144
Number of pages11
JournalSociologia Ruralis
Volume52
Issue number1
Early online date18 Oct 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

health service
protest
citizen
social justice
frustration
equivalence
decision-making process
appeal
rhetoric
deficit
inclusion
interpretation
Law
resources

Keywords

  • Health Services
  • Rural
  • Rights

Cite this

Rural Citizens' Rights to Accessible Health Services : An Exploration. / Farrington, John Hugh; Farmer, Jane; Nimegeer, Amy; Rodger, Gaener.

In: Sociologia Ruralis, Vol. 52, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 134-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farrington, John Hugh ; Farmer, Jane ; Nimegeer, Amy ; Rodger, Gaener. / Rural Citizens' Rights to Accessible Health Services : An Exploration. In: Sociologia Ruralis. 2012 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 134-144.
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