Scotland and England’s Colliding Nationalisms: Neoliberalism and the Fracturing of the United Kingdom

John Bone* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper explores the growing divide between Scotland and England, a schism that was beginning to take form with Scottish devolution and which has grown exponentially since the Independence Referendum of 2014. The central argument presented in the paper is that renewed impetus for national distinction and self-determination in Scotland is best understood as one facet of a much wider popular disenchantment and growing restiveness with the trajectory of contemporary UK politics, culture and society that has found an outlet via a resurgent nationalist discourse and institutional framework.
Analysis here is approached via the application of an original biosocial theory with the aim of presenting further insights into the underlying processes driving contemporary political instability. Moreover, it is argued that this scenario can be understood, and may shed light upon, the wider rise in nationalist and populist sentiment that is contributing to increasing political turbulence across Europe and beyond.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Politics
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 9 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Nationalism
  • Scotland independence
  • Brexit
  • Neoliberalism
  • populism
  • biosocial theory

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