Scottish Religious and Moral Education

A Response to: Mismatches Between Legislative Policy and School Practice in Religious Education: The Scottish Case Yonah H. Matemba a University of the West of Scotland, Ayr, Scotland, UK Published online: 17 Feb 2015

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

As a Scottish academic specialising in training teachers in the subject Religious and Moral Education (RME) I was interested to see that there was an article on the Scottish context in the February edition of Religious Education (Matemba 2015). Such articles on the Scottish jurisdiction, with its unique flavours and points for comparison with approaches elsewhere, are rare and welcome.

However, I was disappointed to find out that the article misrepresents the Scottish situation and would like to contest a number of claims made by Matemba. The broad aims of Matemba’s article are to discuss the nature of
Scottish Religious Education (RE); investigate the teaching of Christianity
‘vis-­‐à-­‐vis’ the teaching of ‘other’ world religions, and offer an account of
RE provision in Scotland. In this response to Matemba I intend to offer
alternative views.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalReligious Education
Volume110
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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moral education
religious education
mismatch
school
Teaching
teacher training
edition
jurisdiction
Religion
Moral Education
Mismatch
Religious Education
Scotland

Keywords

  • Religious Education
  • Scotland
  • Philosophy in Schools

Cite this

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title = "Scottish Religious and Moral Education: A Response to: Mismatches Between Legislative Policy and School Practice in Religious Education: The Scottish Case Yonah H. Matemba a University of the West of Scotland, Ayr, Scotland, UK Published online: 17 Feb 2015",
abstract = "As a Scottish academic specialising in training teachers in the subject Religious and Moral Education (RME) I was interested to see that there was an article on the Scottish context in the February edition of Religious Education (Matemba 2015). Such articles on the Scottish jurisdiction, with its unique flavours and points for comparison with approaches elsewhere, are rare and welcome.However, I was disappointed to find out that the article misrepresents the Scottish situation and would like to contest a number of claims made by Matemba. The broad aims of Matemba’s article are to discuss the nature ofScottish Religious Education (RE); investigate the teaching of Christianity‘vis-­‐{\`a}-­‐vis’ the teaching of ‘other’ world religions, and offer an account ofRE provision in Scotland. In this response to Matemba I intend to offeralternative views.",
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N2 - As a Scottish academic specialising in training teachers in the subject Religious and Moral Education (RME) I was interested to see that there was an article on the Scottish context in the February edition of Religious Education (Matemba 2015). Such articles on the Scottish jurisdiction, with its unique flavours and points for comparison with approaches elsewhere, are rare and welcome.However, I was disappointed to find out that the article misrepresents the Scottish situation and would like to contest a number of claims made by Matemba. The broad aims of Matemba’s article are to discuss the nature ofScottish Religious Education (RE); investigate the teaching of Christianity‘vis-­‐à-­‐vis’ the teaching of ‘other’ world religions, and offer an account ofRE provision in Scotland. In this response to Matemba I intend to offeralternative views.

AB - As a Scottish academic specialising in training teachers in the subject Religious and Moral Education (RME) I was interested to see that there was an article on the Scottish context in the February edition of Religious Education (Matemba 2015). Such articles on the Scottish jurisdiction, with its unique flavours and points for comparison with approaches elsewhere, are rare and welcome.However, I was disappointed to find out that the article misrepresents the Scottish situation and would like to contest a number of claims made by Matemba. The broad aims of Matemba’s article are to discuss the nature ofScottish Religious Education (RE); investigate the teaching of Christianity‘vis-­‐à-­‐vis’ the teaching of ‘other’ world religions, and offer an account ofRE provision in Scotland. In this response to Matemba I intend to offeralternative views.

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KW - Philosophy in Schools

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