Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in subfertile women

S Macmillan, A Templeton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the UK and Europe. The majority of female infections are asymptomatic and recognized sequelae include pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy, Women with chlamydial infection who undergo uterine instrumentation are recognized to beat risk of ascending infection. Most patients attending for infertility investigations and treatment will undergo some form of uterine instrumentation. Published data regarding the prevalence of chlamydial infection in the subfertile are few and conflicting. In this study, more than 400 consecutive women presenting for infertility investigation and treatment at a single regional fertility centre were screened for Chlamydia. Half were screened using enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and half by ligase chain reaction (LCR), Prevalence by diagnostic test was 0% with EIA and 1.9% with LCR, Overall, the low prevalence was at least partly explained by older age. Until more evidence comes from studies testing consecutive subfertile patients both with EIA and a DNA amplification method such as LCR, centres using EIA should consider using prophylactic antibiotics prior to uterine instrumentation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3009-3012
Number of pages4
JournalHuman Reproduction Update
Volume14
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • infertility
  • prevalence
  • screening
  • uterine instrumentation
  • PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE
  • GENITAL CHLAMYDIA
  • INFERTILE WOMEN
  • INFECTION
  • HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAPHY
  • COUPLES
  • PROPHYLAXIS
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • ABORTION
  • FEMALE

Cite this

Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in subfertile women. / Macmillan, S ; Templeton, A .

In: Human Reproduction Update, Vol. 14, 1999, p. 3009-3012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the UK and Europe. The majority of female infections are asymptomatic and recognized sequelae include pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy, Women with chlamydial infection who undergo uterine instrumentation are recognized to beat risk of ascending infection. Most patients attending for infertility investigations and treatment will undergo some form of uterine instrumentation. Published data regarding the prevalence of chlamydial infection in the subfertile are few and conflicting. In this study, more than 400 consecutive women presenting for infertility investigation and treatment at a single regional fertility centre were screened for Chlamydia. Half were screened using enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and half by ligase chain reaction (LCR), Prevalence by diagnostic test was 0% with EIA and 1.9% with LCR, Overall, the low prevalence was at least partly explained by older age. Until more evidence comes from studies testing consecutive subfertile patients both with EIA and a DNA amplification method such as LCR, centres using EIA should consider using prophylactic antibiotics prior to uterine instrumentation.

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