Seasonal patterns of greenhouse gas emissions from a forest-to-bog restored site in northern Scotland: influence 3 of micro-topography and vegetation on carbon dioxide and methane dynamics

Valeria Mazzola* (Corresponding Author), Mike Perks, Jo Smith, Jagadeesh Yeluripati, Georgios Xenakis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Northern peatlands play an important role in the regulation of atmospheric greenhouse gas balance, functioning as a net carbon sink with low rates of organic decomposition. However, perturbations such as drainage, increase peat oxidation, which may lead to enhanced gaseous release of carbon. For this reason, the number of restoration projects that aim to rewet blanket bogs have increased in the last few years. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the impact of restoration on emissions of greenhouse gases, such as methane, particularly in sites restored from forestry. In this paper, we investigate the seasonal greenhouse gas dynamics in a forest-to-bog restoration site in Scotland. We analyse the effects of restoration on both carbon dioxide and methane fluxes, and investigate which site factors (micro-topography, vegetation type, soil moisture and temperature) drive the processes of gaseous exchange between the bog surface and the atmosphere. Our results show that the original surface is near greenhouse gases equilibrium at -0.28 gCO2eq m2 d
-1 22 , that micro-topographic features act as a net greenhouse gas sink (ridges = -0.94 gCO2eq m2 d-1 23 and furrows = -0.86 gCO2eq m2 d-1 ), while bog pool is a net source of greenhouse gases (0.98 gCO2eq m2 d-1 24 ). We found different vegetation species play a key role in greenhouse gas flux dynamics, especially in forestry-derived micro-topographical features, and their
presence and influence on greenhouse gas dynamics should be accounted for to provide a more comprehensive understanding of emissions associated with restoration management practices.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Soil Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Greenhouse gas balance
  • methane
  • micro-topography
  • net ecosystem exchange
  • peatland restoration
  • scotland
  • vascularplants

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