Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain

Paul Nicholas Williams, Enzo Lombi, Guo-Xin Sun, Kirk Scheckel, Yongguan Zhu, Xinbin Feng, Jianming Zhu, Anne-Marie Carey, Eureka Adomako, Youssef Lawgali, Claire Marie Deacon, Andrew Alexander Meharg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by underlying geology, regional soil Se variations are often mirrored by their locally grown staples. Despite this, the Se concentrations of much of the world's rice, the mainstay of so many, is poorly characterized, for both total Se content and Se speciation. In this study, 1092 samples of market sourced polished rice were obtained. The sampled rice encompassed dominant rice producing and exporting countries. Rice from the U.S. and India were found to be the most enriched, while mean average levels were lowest in Egyptian rice: similar to 32-fold less than their North American equivalents. By weighting country averages by contribution to either global production or export, modeled baseline values for both were produced. Based on a daily rice consumption of 300 g day(-1), around 75% of the grains from the production and export pools would fail to provide 70% of daily recommended Se intakes. Furthermore, Se localization and speciation characterization using X-ray fluorescence (mu-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (mu-XANES) techniques were investigated in a Se-rich sample. The results revealed that the large majority of Se in the endosperm was present in organic forms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6024-6030
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science & Technology
Volume43
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009

Keywords

  • MARKET BASKET SURVEY
  • HUMAN HEALTH
  • RURAL BANGLADESH
  • FOOD CROPS
  • GRAIN
  • SPECIATION
  • PLANTS
  • SOIL
  • BIOFORTIFICATION
  • MICRONUTRIENTS

Cite this

Williams, P. N., Lombi, E., Sun, G-X., Scheckel, K., Zhu, Y., Feng, X., ... Meharg, A. A. (2009). Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain. Environmental Science & Technology, 43(15), 6024-6030. https://doi.org/10.1021/es900671m

Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain. / Williams, Paul Nicholas; Lombi, Enzo; Sun, Guo-Xin; Scheckel, Kirk; Zhu, Yongguan; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Carey, Anne-Marie; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youssef; Deacon, Claire Marie; Meharg, Andrew Alexander.

In: Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 43, No. 15, 01.08.2009, p. 6024-6030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, PN, Lombi, E, Sun, G-X, Scheckel, K, Zhu, Y, Feng, X, Zhu, J, Carey, A-M, Adomako, E, Lawgali, Y, Deacon, CM & Meharg, AA 2009, 'Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain', Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 43, no. 15, pp. 6024-6030. https://doi.org/10.1021/es900671m
Williams PN, Lombi E, Sun G-X, Scheckel K, Zhu Y, Feng X et al. Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain. Environmental Science & Technology. 2009 Aug 1;43(15):6024-6030. https://doi.org/10.1021/es900671m
Williams, Paul Nicholas ; Lombi, Enzo ; Sun, Guo-Xin ; Scheckel, Kirk ; Zhu, Yongguan ; Feng, Xinbin ; Zhu, Jianming ; Carey, Anne-Marie ; Adomako, Eureka ; Lawgali, Youssef ; Deacon, Claire Marie ; Meharg, Andrew Alexander. / Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain. In: Environmental Science & Technology. 2009 ; Vol. 43, No. 15. pp. 6024-6030.
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