Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort

Guillaume Emaresi, Isabelle Henry, Esther Gonzalez, Alexandre Roulin, Pierre Bize

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Oxidative stress, determined by the balance between the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defences, is hypothesised to play an important role in shaping the cost of reproduction and life history trade-offs. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated reproductive effort in 94 breeding pairs of tawny owls (Strix aluco) to investigate the sex- and melanic-specific effects on markers of oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs). This colour polymorphic bird species shows sex-specific division of labour and melanic-specific history strategies. Brood sizes at hatching were experimentally enlarged or reduced to increase or decrease reproductive effort, respectively. We obtained an integrative measure of the oxidative balance by measuring ROS production by RBC, intracellular antioxidant gluthatione levels (tGSH) and membrane resistance to ROS. We found that light melanic males (the sex assuming offspring food provisioning) produced more ROS than darker conspecifics, but only when rearing an enlarged brood. In both sexes, light melanic individuals had also a larger pool of intracellular antioxidant glutathione than darker owls under relaxed reproductive conditions (i.e. reduced brood), but not when investing substantial effort in current reproduction (enlarged brood). Finally, resistance to oxidative stress was differently affected by the brood size manipulation experiment in males and females independently of their plumage coloration. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that reproductive effort can alter the oxidative balance in a sex- and colour-specific way. This further emphasizes the close link between melanin-based coloration and life history strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-79
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume219
Issue number1
Early online date13 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

melanism
Strigiformes
Melanosis
reproductive effort
antioxidant
reactive oxygen species
Reactive Oxygen Species
brood size
gender
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
color
Antioxidants
life history
blood
food provisioning
Reproduction
erythrocytes
melanin
Color

Keywords

  • Brood size manipulation
  • Colour polymorphism
  • Glutathione
  • Life history traits
  • ROS production
  • Oxidative stress

Cite this

Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort. / Emaresi, Guillaume; Henry, Isabelle; Gonzalez, Esther; Roulin, Alexandre; Bize, Pierre.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 219, No. 1, 06.01.2016, p. 73-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Emaresi, Guillaume ; Henry, Isabelle ; Gonzalez, Esther ; Roulin, Alexandre ; Bize, Pierre. / Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort. In: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 219, No. 1. pp. 73-79.
@article{0bb137c6cbf54fdf91f2300d5b6c323f,
title = "Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort",
abstract = "Oxidative stress, determined by the balance between the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defences, is hypothesised to play an important role in shaping the cost of reproduction and life history trade-offs. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated reproductive effort in 94 breeding pairs of tawny owls (Strix aluco) to investigate the sex- and melanic-specific effects on markers of oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs). This colour polymorphic bird species shows sex-specific division of labour and melanic-specific history strategies. Brood sizes at hatching were experimentally enlarged or reduced to increase or decrease reproductive effort, respectively. We obtained an integrative measure of the oxidative balance by measuring ROS production by RBC, intracellular antioxidant gluthatione levels (tGSH) and membrane resistance to ROS. We found that light melanic males (the sex assuming offspring food provisioning) produced more ROS than darker conspecifics, but only when rearing an enlarged brood. In both sexes, light melanic individuals had also a larger pool of intracellular antioxidant glutathione than darker owls under relaxed reproductive conditions (i.e. reduced brood), but not when investing substantial effort in current reproduction (enlarged brood). Finally, resistance to oxidative stress was differently affected by the brood size manipulation experiment in males and females independently of their plumage coloration. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that reproductive effort can alter the oxidative balance in a sex- and colour-specific way. This further emphasizes the close link between melanin-based coloration and life history strategies.",
keywords = "Brood size manipulation, Colour polymorphism, Glutathione, Life history traits, ROS production, Oxidative stress",
author = "Guillaume Emaresi and Isabelle Henry and Esther Gonzalez and Alexandre Roulin and Pierre Bize",
note = "Acknowledgements We are grateful to Olympe Arevalo, Ester Luzio, Dominique Vuille, Alia Mafli, Anne-Lyse Ducrest, Valentijn van den Brink, Pierre-Alain Ravussin and Sophie Cotting for assistance in the field and/or during laboratory work, and to two anonymous referees for helpful suggestions. Funding: This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation [grants PPOA-102913 and 3100AO_120517 to AR and 31003A_124988 to PB).",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1242/jeb.128959",
language = "English",
volume = "219",
pages = "73--79",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Biology",
issn = "0022-0949",
publisher = "Company of Biologists Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex- and melanism-specific variations in the oxidative status of adult tawny owls in response to manipulated reproductive effort

AU - Emaresi, Guillaume

AU - Henry, Isabelle

AU - Gonzalez, Esther

AU - Roulin, Alexandre

AU - Bize, Pierre

N1 - Acknowledgements We are grateful to Olympe Arevalo, Ester Luzio, Dominique Vuille, Alia Mafli, Anne-Lyse Ducrest, Valentijn van den Brink, Pierre-Alain Ravussin and Sophie Cotting for assistance in the field and/or during laboratory work, and to two anonymous referees for helpful suggestions. Funding: This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation [grants PPOA-102913 and 3100AO_120517 to AR and 31003A_124988 to PB).

PY - 2016/1/6

Y1 - 2016/1/6

N2 - Oxidative stress, determined by the balance between the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defences, is hypothesised to play an important role in shaping the cost of reproduction and life history trade-offs. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated reproductive effort in 94 breeding pairs of tawny owls (Strix aluco) to investigate the sex- and melanic-specific effects on markers of oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs). This colour polymorphic bird species shows sex-specific division of labour and melanic-specific history strategies. Brood sizes at hatching were experimentally enlarged or reduced to increase or decrease reproductive effort, respectively. We obtained an integrative measure of the oxidative balance by measuring ROS production by RBC, intracellular antioxidant gluthatione levels (tGSH) and membrane resistance to ROS. We found that light melanic males (the sex assuming offspring food provisioning) produced more ROS than darker conspecifics, but only when rearing an enlarged brood. In both sexes, light melanic individuals had also a larger pool of intracellular antioxidant glutathione than darker owls under relaxed reproductive conditions (i.e. reduced brood), but not when investing substantial effort in current reproduction (enlarged brood). Finally, resistance to oxidative stress was differently affected by the brood size manipulation experiment in males and females independently of their plumage coloration. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that reproductive effort can alter the oxidative balance in a sex- and colour-specific way. This further emphasizes the close link between melanin-based coloration and life history strategies.

AB - Oxidative stress, determined by the balance between the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defences, is hypothesised to play an important role in shaping the cost of reproduction and life history trade-offs. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated reproductive effort in 94 breeding pairs of tawny owls (Strix aluco) to investigate the sex- and melanic-specific effects on markers of oxidative stress in red blood cells (RBCs). This colour polymorphic bird species shows sex-specific division of labour and melanic-specific history strategies. Brood sizes at hatching were experimentally enlarged or reduced to increase or decrease reproductive effort, respectively. We obtained an integrative measure of the oxidative balance by measuring ROS production by RBC, intracellular antioxidant gluthatione levels (tGSH) and membrane resistance to ROS. We found that light melanic males (the sex assuming offspring food provisioning) produced more ROS than darker conspecifics, but only when rearing an enlarged brood. In both sexes, light melanic individuals had also a larger pool of intracellular antioxidant glutathione than darker owls under relaxed reproductive conditions (i.e. reduced brood), but not when investing substantial effort in current reproduction (enlarged brood). Finally, resistance to oxidative stress was differently affected by the brood size manipulation experiment in males and females independently of their plumage coloration. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that reproductive effort can alter the oxidative balance in a sex- and colour-specific way. This further emphasizes the close link between melanin-based coloration and life history strategies.

KW - Brood size manipulation

KW - Colour polymorphism

KW - Glutathione

KW - Life history traits

KW - ROS production

KW - Oxidative stress

U2 - 10.1242/jeb.128959

DO - 10.1242/jeb.128959

M3 - Article

VL - 219

SP - 73

EP - 79

JO - Journal of Experimental Biology

JF - Journal of Experimental Biology

SN - 0022-0949

IS - 1

ER -