Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird

Sue Lewis, S. Benvenuti, L. Dall'Antonia, R. Griffiths, L. Money, T. N. Sherratt, S. Wanless, K. C. Hamer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    187 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of parents have been observed in a number of sexually size-dimorphic birds, particularly seabirds, and the usual inference has been that these sex-specific differences are mediated primarily by differences in body size. To test this explanation, we compared the foraging behaviour of parents in a monomorphic seabird species, the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Using specially designed instruments and radio telemetry we found that individuals of both sexes were consistent in the directions and durations of their foraging trips. However, there were significant differences in the foraging behaviour of males and females. Female gannets were not only more selective than males in the areas where they foraged, but they also made longer, deeper dives and spent more time on the sea surface than males. As the sexes are morphologically similar in this species, then these differences are unlikely to have been mediated by body size. Our work highlights the need to investigate sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of seabirds and other species more closely, in order to test alternative theories that do not rely on differences in body size.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1687-1693
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences
    Volume269
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • biparental care
    • sexual size dimorphism
    • diving
    • gannet
    • Morus bassanus
    • SHAG PHALACROCORAX-ATRICEPS
    • CHICK-REARING RAZORBILLS
    • GANNETS SULA-BASSANA
    • WANDERING ALBATROSSES
    • NORTHERN GANNETS
    • NEW-ZEALAND
    • SATELLITE TELEMETRY
    • FICEDULA-HYPOLEUCA
    • FEEDING LOCATIONS
    • PIED FLYCATCHERS

    Cite this

    Lewis, S., Benvenuti, S., Dall'Antonia, L., Griffiths, R., Money, L., Sherratt, T. N., ... Hamer, K. C. (2002). Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences, 269, 1687-1693. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2002.2083

    Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird. / Lewis, Sue; Benvenuti, S.; Dall'Antonia, L.; Griffiths, R.; Money, L.; Sherratt, T. N.; Wanless, S.; Hamer, K. C.

    In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences, Vol. 269, 2002, p. 1687-1693.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lewis, S, Benvenuti, S, Dall'Antonia, L, Griffiths, R, Money, L, Sherratt, TN, Wanless, S & Hamer, KC 2002, 'Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird' Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences, vol. 269, pp. 1687-1693. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2002.2083
    Lewis, Sue ; Benvenuti, S. ; Dall'Antonia, L. ; Griffiths, R. ; Money, L. ; Sherratt, T. N. ; Wanless, S. ; Hamer, K. C. / Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 269. pp. 1687-1693.
    @article{2228d622f9bb41279212eede8c535408,
    title = "Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird",
    abstract = "Sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of parents have been observed in a number of sexually size-dimorphic birds, particularly seabirds, and the usual inference has been that these sex-specific differences are mediated primarily by differences in body size. To test this explanation, we compared the foraging behaviour of parents in a monomorphic seabird species, the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Using specially designed instruments and radio telemetry we found that individuals of both sexes were consistent in the directions and durations of their foraging trips. However, there were significant differences in the foraging behaviour of males and females. Female gannets were not only more selective than males in the areas where they foraged, but they also made longer, deeper dives and spent more time on the sea surface than males. As the sexes are morphologically similar in this species, then these differences are unlikely to have been mediated by body size. Our work highlights the need to investigate sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of seabirds and other species more closely, in order to test alternative theories that do not rely on differences in body size.",
    keywords = "biparental care, sexual size dimorphism, diving, gannet, Morus bassanus, SHAG PHALACROCORAX-ATRICEPS, CHICK-REARING RAZORBILLS, GANNETS SULA-BASSANA, WANDERING ALBATROSSES, NORTHERN GANNETS, NEW-ZEALAND, SATELLITE TELEMETRY, FICEDULA-HYPOLEUCA, FEEDING LOCATIONS, PIED FLYCATCHERS",
    author = "Sue Lewis and S. Benvenuti and L. Dall'Antonia and R. Griffiths and L. Money and Sherratt, {T. N.} and S. Wanless and Hamer, {K. C.}",
    year = "2002",
    doi = "10.1098/rspb.2002.2083",
    language = "English",
    volume = "269",
    pages = "1687--1693",
    journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences",
    issn = "0962-8452",
    publisher = "ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Sex-specific faraging behaviour in a monomorphic seabird

    AU - Lewis, Sue

    AU - Benvenuti, S.

    AU - Dall'Antonia, L.

    AU - Griffiths, R.

    AU - Money, L.

    AU - Sherratt, T. N.

    AU - Wanless, S.

    AU - Hamer, K. C.

    PY - 2002

    Y1 - 2002

    N2 - Sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of parents have been observed in a number of sexually size-dimorphic birds, particularly seabirds, and the usual inference has been that these sex-specific differences are mediated primarily by differences in body size. To test this explanation, we compared the foraging behaviour of parents in a monomorphic seabird species, the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Using specially designed instruments and radio telemetry we found that individuals of both sexes were consistent in the directions and durations of their foraging trips. However, there were significant differences in the foraging behaviour of males and females. Female gannets were not only more selective than males in the areas where they foraged, but they also made longer, deeper dives and spent more time on the sea surface than males. As the sexes are morphologically similar in this species, then these differences are unlikely to have been mediated by body size. Our work highlights the need to investigate sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of seabirds and other species more closely, in order to test alternative theories that do not rely on differences in body size.

    AB - Sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of parents have been observed in a number of sexually size-dimorphic birds, particularly seabirds, and the usual inference has been that these sex-specific differences are mediated primarily by differences in body size. To test this explanation, we compared the foraging behaviour of parents in a monomorphic seabird species, the northern gannet Morus bassanus. Using specially designed instruments and radio telemetry we found that individuals of both sexes were consistent in the directions and durations of their foraging trips. However, there were significant differences in the foraging behaviour of males and females. Female gannets were not only more selective than males in the areas where they foraged, but they also made longer, deeper dives and spent more time on the sea surface than males. As the sexes are morphologically similar in this species, then these differences are unlikely to have been mediated by body size. Our work highlights the need to investigate sexual differences in the foraging behaviour of seabirds and other species more closely, in order to test alternative theories that do not rely on differences in body size.

    KW - biparental care

    KW - sexual size dimorphism

    KW - diving

    KW - gannet

    KW - Morus bassanus

    KW - SHAG PHALACROCORAX-ATRICEPS

    KW - CHICK-REARING RAZORBILLS

    KW - GANNETS SULA-BASSANA

    KW - WANDERING ALBATROSSES

    KW - NORTHERN GANNETS

    KW - NEW-ZEALAND

    KW - SATELLITE TELEMETRY

    KW - FICEDULA-HYPOLEUCA

    KW - FEEDING LOCATIONS

    KW - PIED FLYCATCHERS

    U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2002.2083

    DO - 10.1098/rspb.2002.2083

    M3 - Article

    VL - 269

    SP - 1687

    EP - 1693

    JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences

    JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. B, Biological Sciences

    SN - 0962-8452

    ER -