Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls

J. Aguzzi, A. J. Jamieson, T. Fujii, V. Sbragaglia, C. Costa, P. Menesatti, Y. Fujiwara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The deep sea is a low food input environment, hence large food falls from the surface waters are important in supporting a wealth of scavenging deep-sea fauna. The probability of observing such events is very low, due to their unpredictable and short-lived nature. The video system of a cabled observatory installed within a cold seep clam field in Sagami Bay (1100 m depth; Central Japan) recorded a rare event. We observed a fish dying directly in front of the camera and being immediately perceived and preyed upon by Buccinum yoroianum (Neogastropoda: Buccinidae), while still alive. Up to 76 large snails responded to the fish and consumed the carcass within ~8 h, with no intervention by decapod crustaceans. There was only small participation of eelpouts (Zoarcidae). For comparison, we report on supplementary findings from a different area and depth of the Pacific Ocean. These observations were recorded by a baited camera lander which simulated a food fall. Within 6 h, the buccinid Tacita zenkevitchi aggregated on the bait, competing with fishes. These observations confirm that deep-sea buccinids can shift their feeding behaviour between active predation and scavenging. Our perception, however, seems conditioned by the observational methodology we use: buccinids may appear as scavengers when using photography (e.g. by baited landers) producing single snapshots in time, or as predators when observed in a natural setting and video-taped continuously with a cabled observatory.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-253
Number of pages7
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume458
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

imitation foods
natural foods
feeding behavior
gastropod
deep sea
Gastropoda
cameras
food
fish
Buccinidae
observatory
cold seep
photography
bait
scavenger
clams
Pacific Ocean
baits
Decapoda
snail

Cite this

Aguzzi, J., Jamieson, A. J., Fujii, T., Sbragaglia, V., Costa, C., Menesatti, P., & Fujiwara, Y. (2012). Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 458, 247-253. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps09758

Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls. / Aguzzi, J.; Jamieson, A. J.; Fujii, T.; Sbragaglia, V.; Costa, C.; Menesatti, P.; Fujiwara, Y.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 458, 2012, p. 247-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aguzzi, J, Jamieson, AJ, Fujii, T, Sbragaglia, V, Costa, C, Menesatti, P & Fujiwara, Y 2012, 'Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls', Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 458, pp. 247-253. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps09758
Aguzzi, J. ; Jamieson, A. J. ; Fujii, T. ; Sbragaglia, V. ; Costa, C. ; Menesatti, P. ; Fujiwara, Y. / Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2012 ; Vol. 458. pp. 247-253.
@article{b3ccffd2351144cda0c1be225baf915f,
title = "Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls",
abstract = "The deep sea is a low food input environment, hence large food falls from the surface waters are important in supporting a wealth of scavenging deep-sea fauna. The probability of observing such events is very low, due to their unpredictable and short-lived nature. The video system of a cabled observatory installed within a cold seep clam field in Sagami Bay (1100 m depth; Central Japan) recorded a rare event. We observed a fish dying directly in front of the camera and being immediately perceived and preyed upon by Buccinum yoroianum (Neogastropoda: Buccinidae), while still alive. Up to 76 large snails responded to the fish and consumed the carcass within ~8 h, with no intervention by decapod crustaceans. There was only small participation of eelpouts (Zoarcidae). For comparison, we report on supplementary findings from a different area and depth of the Pacific Ocean. These observations were recorded by a baited camera lander which simulated a food fall. Within 6 h, the buccinid Tacita zenkevitchi aggregated on the bait, competing with fishes. These observations confirm that deep-sea buccinids can shift their feeding behaviour between active predation and scavenging. Our perception, however, seems conditioned by the observational methodology we use: buccinids may appear as scavengers when using photography (e.g. by baited landers) producing single snapshots in time, or as predators when observed in a natural setting and video-taped continuously with a cabled observatory.",
author = "J. Aguzzi and Jamieson, {A. J.} and T. Fujii and V. Sbragaglia and C. Costa and P. Menesatti and Y. Fujiwara",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3354/meps09758",
language = "English",
volume = "458",
pages = "247--253",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shifting feeding behaviour of deep-sea buccinid gastropods at natural and simulated food falls

AU - Aguzzi, J.

AU - Jamieson, A. J.

AU - Fujii, T.

AU - Sbragaglia, V.

AU - Costa, C.

AU - Menesatti, P.

AU - Fujiwara, Y.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The deep sea is a low food input environment, hence large food falls from the surface waters are important in supporting a wealth of scavenging deep-sea fauna. The probability of observing such events is very low, due to their unpredictable and short-lived nature. The video system of a cabled observatory installed within a cold seep clam field in Sagami Bay (1100 m depth; Central Japan) recorded a rare event. We observed a fish dying directly in front of the camera and being immediately perceived and preyed upon by Buccinum yoroianum (Neogastropoda: Buccinidae), while still alive. Up to 76 large snails responded to the fish and consumed the carcass within ~8 h, with no intervention by decapod crustaceans. There was only small participation of eelpouts (Zoarcidae). For comparison, we report on supplementary findings from a different area and depth of the Pacific Ocean. These observations were recorded by a baited camera lander which simulated a food fall. Within 6 h, the buccinid Tacita zenkevitchi aggregated on the bait, competing with fishes. These observations confirm that deep-sea buccinids can shift their feeding behaviour between active predation and scavenging. Our perception, however, seems conditioned by the observational methodology we use: buccinids may appear as scavengers when using photography (e.g. by baited landers) producing single snapshots in time, or as predators when observed in a natural setting and video-taped continuously with a cabled observatory.

AB - The deep sea is a low food input environment, hence large food falls from the surface waters are important in supporting a wealth of scavenging deep-sea fauna. The probability of observing such events is very low, due to their unpredictable and short-lived nature. The video system of a cabled observatory installed within a cold seep clam field in Sagami Bay (1100 m depth; Central Japan) recorded a rare event. We observed a fish dying directly in front of the camera and being immediately perceived and preyed upon by Buccinum yoroianum (Neogastropoda: Buccinidae), while still alive. Up to 76 large snails responded to the fish and consumed the carcass within ~8 h, with no intervention by decapod crustaceans. There was only small participation of eelpouts (Zoarcidae). For comparison, we report on supplementary findings from a different area and depth of the Pacific Ocean. These observations were recorded by a baited camera lander which simulated a food fall. Within 6 h, the buccinid Tacita zenkevitchi aggregated on the bait, competing with fishes. These observations confirm that deep-sea buccinids can shift their feeding behaviour between active predation and scavenging. Our perception, however, seems conditioned by the observational methodology we use: buccinids may appear as scavengers when using photography (e.g. by baited landers) producing single snapshots in time, or as predators when observed in a natural setting and video-taped continuously with a cabled observatory.

U2 - 10.3354/meps09758

DO - 10.3354/meps09758

M3 - Article

VL - 458

SP - 247

EP - 253

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -