Short and long term changes in plasma inflammatory markters associated with pre-eclampsia

D. J. Freeman, F. McManus, E. A. Brown, L. Cherry, John David Norrie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    214 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, and increased systemic inflammatory response and has been associated with an increased maternal risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Low-grade chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined changes in inflammatory markers prospectively during pregnancy, the current inflammatory status of women who had a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia 20 years previously against matched controls, and the association between inflammatory genes and risk of preeclampsia in a case (n=106) control (n=212) study. In control pregnancies (n=34), mean interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels increased 38% (P=0.012) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by 33% (P=0.024) between the first and third trimesters. The mean preeclampsia group IL-10 and TNF-alpha rose by 43% (P=0.013 and P=0.0065, respectively) from the first to the third trimester. In women with preeclampsia only, plasma IL-6 increased from the first to the third trimester (1.66[2.04] to 2.94[2.47] pg/mL; P=0.0004). Twenty years after the index pregnancy, women who had had preeclampsia demonstrated significantly higher IL-6 to IL-10 ratio (3.96[6.07] versus 2.12[1.89]; P=0.034) compared with a healthy index pregnancy 20 years previously, that persisted after adjustment for smoking and current body mass index. The IL-1beta(C-511T), IL-6 (G-174C), TNF-alpha (G-308A), E-selectin (S128R), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (K469E), and C-reactive protein (C1059G) polymorphisms were not associated with risk of developing preeclampsia. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with short- and long-term changes in inflammatory status.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)708-714
    Number of pages6
    JournalHypertension
    Volume44
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Keywords

    • preeclampsia
    • polymorphism
    • cardiovascular diseases
    • inflammation
    • TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR
    • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
    • INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST
    • REACTIVE PROTEIN-LEVELS
    • FACTOR-ALPHA LEVELS
    • ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION
    • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
    • RISK-FACTOR
    • POLYMORPHISM
    • WOMEN

    Cite this

    Short and long term changes in plasma inflammatory markters associated with pre-eclampsia. / Freeman, D. J.; McManus, F.; Brown, E. A.; Cherry, L.; Norrie, John David.

    In: Hypertension, Vol. 44, No. 5, 2004, p. 708-714.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Freeman, D. J. ; McManus, F. ; Brown, E. A. ; Cherry, L. ; Norrie, John David. / Short and long term changes in plasma inflammatory markters associated with pre-eclampsia. In: Hypertension. 2004 ; Vol. 44, No. 5. pp. 708-714.
    @article{98c0cb1284164250b28ed4ace17c1520,
    title = "Short and long term changes in plasma inflammatory markters associated with pre-eclampsia",
    abstract = "Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, and increased systemic inflammatory response and has been associated with an increased maternal risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Low-grade chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined changes in inflammatory markers prospectively during pregnancy, the current inflammatory status of women who had a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia 20 years previously against matched controls, and the association between inflammatory genes and risk of preeclampsia in a case (n=106) control (n=212) study. In control pregnancies (n=34), mean interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels increased 38{\%} (P=0.012) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by 33{\%} (P=0.024) between the first and third trimesters. The mean preeclampsia group IL-10 and TNF-alpha rose by 43{\%} (P=0.013 and P=0.0065, respectively) from the first to the third trimester. In women with preeclampsia only, plasma IL-6 increased from the first to the third trimester (1.66[2.04] to 2.94[2.47] pg/mL; P=0.0004). Twenty years after the index pregnancy, women who had had preeclampsia demonstrated significantly higher IL-6 to IL-10 ratio (3.96[6.07] versus 2.12[1.89]; P=0.034) compared with a healthy index pregnancy 20 years previously, that persisted after adjustment for smoking and current body mass index. The IL-1beta(C-511T), IL-6 (G-174C), TNF-alpha (G-308A), E-selectin (S128R), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (K469E), and C-reactive protein (C1059G) polymorphisms were not associated with risk of developing preeclampsia. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with short- and long-term changes in inflammatory status.",
    keywords = "preeclampsia, polymorphism, cardiovascular diseases, inflammation, TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, REACTIVE PROTEIN-LEVELS, FACTOR-ALPHA LEVELS, ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, RISK-FACTOR, POLYMORPHISM, WOMEN",
    author = "Freeman, {D. J.} and F. McManus and Brown, {E. A.} and L. Cherry and Norrie, {John David}",
    year = "2004",
    doi = "10.1161/01.HYP.0000143849.67254.ca",
    language = "English",
    volume = "44",
    pages = "708--714",
    journal = "Hypertension",
    issn = "0194-911X",
    publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
    number = "5",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Short and long term changes in plasma inflammatory markters associated with pre-eclampsia

    AU - Freeman, D. J.

    AU - McManus, F.

    AU - Brown, E. A.

    AU - Cherry, L.

    AU - Norrie, John David

    PY - 2004

    Y1 - 2004

    N2 - Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, and increased systemic inflammatory response and has been associated with an increased maternal risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Low-grade chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined changes in inflammatory markers prospectively during pregnancy, the current inflammatory status of women who had a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia 20 years previously against matched controls, and the association between inflammatory genes and risk of preeclampsia in a case (n=106) control (n=212) study. In control pregnancies (n=34), mean interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels increased 38% (P=0.012) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by 33% (P=0.024) between the first and third trimesters. The mean preeclampsia group IL-10 and TNF-alpha rose by 43% (P=0.013 and P=0.0065, respectively) from the first to the third trimester. In women with preeclampsia only, plasma IL-6 increased from the first to the third trimester (1.66[2.04] to 2.94[2.47] pg/mL; P=0.0004). Twenty years after the index pregnancy, women who had had preeclampsia demonstrated significantly higher IL-6 to IL-10 ratio (3.96[6.07] versus 2.12[1.89]; P=0.034) compared with a healthy index pregnancy 20 years previously, that persisted after adjustment for smoking and current body mass index. The IL-1beta(C-511T), IL-6 (G-174C), TNF-alpha (G-308A), E-selectin (S128R), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (K469E), and C-reactive protein (C1059G) polymorphisms were not associated with risk of developing preeclampsia. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with short- and long-term changes in inflammatory status.

    AB - Preeclampsia is characterized by hypertension, dyslipidemia, and increased systemic inflammatory response and has been associated with an increased maternal risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Low-grade chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined changes in inflammatory markers prospectively during pregnancy, the current inflammatory status of women who had a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia 20 years previously against matched controls, and the association between inflammatory genes and risk of preeclampsia in a case (n=106) control (n=212) study. In control pregnancies (n=34), mean interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels increased 38% (P=0.012) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by 33% (P=0.024) between the first and third trimesters. The mean preeclampsia group IL-10 and TNF-alpha rose by 43% (P=0.013 and P=0.0065, respectively) from the first to the third trimester. In women with preeclampsia only, plasma IL-6 increased from the first to the third trimester (1.66[2.04] to 2.94[2.47] pg/mL; P=0.0004). Twenty years after the index pregnancy, women who had had preeclampsia demonstrated significantly higher IL-6 to IL-10 ratio (3.96[6.07] versus 2.12[1.89]; P=0.034) compared with a healthy index pregnancy 20 years previously, that persisted after adjustment for smoking and current body mass index. The IL-1beta(C-511T), IL-6 (G-174C), TNF-alpha (G-308A), E-selectin (S128R), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (K469E), and C-reactive protein (C1059G) polymorphisms were not associated with risk of developing preeclampsia. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with short- and long-term changes in inflammatory status.

    KW - preeclampsia

    KW - polymorphism

    KW - cardiovascular diseases

    KW - inflammation

    KW - TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR

    KW - CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE

    KW - INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST

    KW - REACTIVE PROTEIN-LEVELS

    KW - FACTOR-ALPHA LEVELS

    KW - ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    KW - CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE

    KW - RISK-FACTOR

    KW - POLYMORPHISM

    KW - WOMEN

    U2 - 10.1161/01.HYP.0000143849.67254.ca

    DO - 10.1161/01.HYP.0000143849.67254.ca

    M3 - Article

    VL - 44

    SP - 708

    EP - 714

    JO - Hypertension

    JF - Hypertension

    SN - 0194-911X

    IS - 5

    ER -