SHORT-FORMS OF THE UK WAIS-R - REGRESSION EQUATIONS AND THEIR PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY IN A GENERAL-POPULATION SAMPLE

John Robertson Crawford, K M ALLAN, A M JACK

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Abstract

A sample of 200 healthy subjects, representative of the adult UK population in terms of age, sex and social class distribution, were administered a full-length WAIS-R (UK). Regression equations were built to predict full-length IQ from a series of short-forms. The short-forms ranged from a two-subtest version proposed by Silverstein (1982) to a seven-subtest version proposed by Warrington, James & Maciejewski (1986). Regression equations, their standard errors of estimate and confidence intervals are presented as well as IQ conversion tables. The short-forms are evaluated in terms of their validity in predicting full-length IQ and in terms of their clinical utility. The advantages of regression-based estimates of full-length IQ over those derived from conventional prorating are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-202
Number of pages12
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Psychology
Volume31
Publication statusPublished - May 1992

Cite this

SHORT-FORMS OF THE UK WAIS-R - REGRESSION EQUATIONS AND THEIR PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY IN A GENERAL-POPULATION SAMPLE. / Crawford, John Robertson; ALLAN, K M ; JACK, A M .

In: British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 31, 05.1992, p. 191-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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