Significance of large-scale sand injectites as long-term fluid conduits: evidence from seismic data

Andrew Hurst, J. Cartwright, M. Huuse, R. Jonk, Anne Marie Schwab, Davide Duranti, Bryan Thomas Cronin

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Abstract

Sand injectites and related features that are interpreted to have formed by large-scale, often sudden, fluid escape in the shallow (typically <500 m) crust are readily imaged on modern seismic data. Many of the features have geometrical similarity to igneous dykes and sills and cross-cut the depositional stratigraphy. Sand injectites may be multiphase and form connected, high-permeability networks that transect kilometre-scale intervals of otherwise fine-grained, low-permeability strata. North Sea examples often form significant hydrocarbon reservoirs and typically contain degraded, low-gravity crude oil. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope data from cements in sand injectites record a mixing of aqueous fluids of deep and shallow origin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-274
Number of pages11
JournalGeoFluids
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • fluid migration
  • sand injection
  • seismic data
  • RESERVOIR GEOMETRIES
  • ALBA FIELD
  • NORTH-SEA
  • DEFORMATION
  • INTRUSIONS
  • SEDIMENTS
  • BASIN
  • UKCS

Cite this

Hurst, A., Cartwright, J., Huuse, M., Jonk, R., Schwab, A. M., Duranti, D., & Cronin, B. T. (2003). Significance of large-scale sand injectites as long-term fluid conduits: evidence from seismic data. GeoFluids, 3(4), 263-274. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1468-8123.2003.00066.x