Simplified technique for 75% and 90% hepatic resection with hemodynamic monitoring in a large white swine model

Petru Bucur, Mohamed Bekheit, Chloe Audebert, Irene Vignon-Clementel, Eric Vibert* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Accurate measuring of the hepatic hemodynamic parameters in humans is inconvenient. Swine has been a favorite surgical model for the study of liver conditions due to many similarities with human livers. However, pigs cannot tolerate pedicle clamping and to reduce bleeding during resection a simplified technique is required. The aim of this study is to present a simplified technique for different percentages of hepatic resection in a porcine model. Methods Twenty-two consecutive large white pigs were operated with 75% and 90% liver resection. Computarized tomography liver volumetry is performed before and after surgery. In both types of surgery, hemodynamic monitoring was performed using a specialized apparatus. Results Resections were performed in both groups successfully. The residual volume in the planned 75% was 235 ± 77 mL and 118 ± 119 mL in the planned 90% resection. For 75% resection, the portal flow was reduced after resection by 8.13 ± 28%, which might be part of systemic circulatory depression. However, the portal pressure increased by 20.1 ± 51%. The hepatic artery flow decreased by 63.86 ± 26.3% as well as the pressure by 5 ± 28%. The central venous pressure at the start of surgery was 3.34 ± 1.9 mm Hg and 2.8 ± 2.2 mm Hg at the end of surgery. The portacaval pressure gradient was 4.4 ± 2.9 mm Hg at the beginning of surgery and was 5.9 ± 2.8 mm Hg at the end of surgery. For 90% resection, the portal flow decreased by 33.6 ± 12.6% and the pressure increased by 104 ± 58%. The hepatic artery flow decreased by 88 ± 7%, and the pressure decreased by 5 ± 14.8%. The central venous pressure was 3.5 ± 1.7 mm Hg before resection and 3 ± 2.5 mm Hg after resection. The portacaval pressure gradient was 3.8 ± 1.1 mm Hg before resection and 8 ± 3.7 mm Hg after resection. The mean anesthesia time was 6.6 ± 1.05 h and 6.9 ± 0.5 h for 75% and 90% resection, respectively. The mean operative time was 4.6 ± 0.9 h and 5 ± 0.7 h for 75% and 90% resections, respectively. The mean time for hepatectomy was 1.23 ± 0.76 h and 2.4 ± 0.1 h for 75% and 90% resection, respectively. The mean time consumed in the measurements was 2.28 ± 1.4 h and 1.1 ± 0.3 h for 75% and 90% resections, respectively. The mean volume of aspirated fluid and blood in the 75% resection was 1062 ± 512 mL, while it was 1050 ± 354 mL in 90% resections. Conclusions The hereby described technique is simple and easily applicable for major liver resection in a porcine model. Portal flow decreases after 90% resection more than in 75% due to the relative reduction of remnant hepatic mass. There was a larger increase in portal pressure following 90% compared to 75% resection. The hepatic artery flow decreases more in 90% than in 75% resections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-130
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume209
Early online date30 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017

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Keywords

  • Hemodynamic monitoring
  • Liver resection
  • Major
  • Pigs
  • Technique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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