Simulation for the masses not masses of simulation- The integrated use of simulation and PRS voting system to assist in teaching clinical decision making for medical students. Results of a pilot study.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceUnpublished paper

Abstract

Background: Personal Response Systems (PRS) increase students’ understanding, initiates discussion and is an efficient method of collecting answers from large groups allowing immediate feedback. (Innes & Main, 2013) Similarly High-Fidelity Simulation allows low-frequency but high-acuity scenarios to be taught in safe environments (Wang et al, 2011; Daniels et al, 2010).

Specific Idea/Innovation: This study proposes to integrate the use of both simulation and PRS voting to assess if this combined method of instruction assists in teaching clinical decision making for final year medical students and is an acceptable, novel and alternative method of instruction from the student’s perspective as it is recognised that simulation is both time and cost expensive.

Methods: Prospective randomized study: Consenting final year medical students from Aberdeen University, on their surgical placement, were randomised to one of two educational intervention groups. The control group received standard lecture case based discussions. The intervention group received a lecture with simulation and interactive PRS voting. Both groups received 4 scenarios over 4 weeks. Assessment was by single best answer multiple choice questions. In the final week participants completed a 5 point Likert-scale evaluation questionnaire. Approved by College Ethics Review Board

Results: 35 consenting students participated in the study. There was no statistical difference in the mean scores between the two groups. Students in the Simulation and PRS group reported that they would like to use this method of educational instruction again (Strongly agree n=18/18), that it was enjoyable (strongly agree n=17/18), that it encouraged student-teacher interaction and was an extremely satisfactory means of learning about medical decision making.

Conclusion: Adding PRS voting to simulation is an effective means of delivering simulation to the masses for teaching medical decision making to senior medical students. Further work should evaluate the cost benefits of simulation for the masses in this respect.

References: Innes G and Main M. Improving learning with personal response systems. Nursing Times 2013 ;109(13):20-22 Wang C, Schopp J, Petscavage J, et al. Prospective randomized comparison of standard didactic lecture versus high-fidelity simulation for radiology resident contrast reaction management training. American Journal of Radiology 2011;196:1288-1295. Daniels K, Arafeh J, Clark A, et al. Prospective Randomized Trial of Simulation versus didactic teaching for obstetrical emergencies. Simulation in healthcare 2010;5(40):40-45
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event6th International Clinical Skills Conference - Prato, Italy, Prato, Italy
Duration: 1 May 20151 May 2015

Conference

Conference6th International Clinical Skills Conference
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityPrato
Period1/05/151/05/15

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