Slow Cenozoic uplift of the western Andean Cordillera indicated by cosmogenic 3He in alluvial boulders from the Pacific Planation Surface

Laura A. Evenstar, Finlay M. Stuart, Adrian J. Hartley, Brain Tattitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To determine the mechanisms responsible for mountain belt growth, it is important to accurately establish the timing of surface uplift. Here we exploit the altitude control on the production rate of in situ cosmogenic nuclides to test the hypothesis that the Andes was uplifted in the late Miocene. High concentrations of in situ cosmogenic 3He (3Hecos) have previously been measured in alluvial boulders on the western flank of the Central Andes, northern Chile (Evenstar et al. 2009). These are consistent with deposition soon after formation of the surface (13–14 Ma). We have modeled the accumulation of cosmogenic 3He in several different surface uplift scenarios and compared them to the measured concentrations. The measured 3Hecos concentrations are too high to be produced by late Miocene uplift and imply that the western flank of the Andean Cordillera attained a substantial part of its current elevation prior to 14 Myr ago.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8448-8455
Number of pages8
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume42
Issue number20
Early online date12 Oct 2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Oct 2015

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spacing
borders
orphan
transform
strokes
caps
margins
uplift
color
cordillera
Miocene
planation
altitude control
Chile
nuclides
mountains
mountain
time measurement

Keywords

  • Andean uplift
  • Chile
  • cosmogenic Isotopes
  • Longitudinal Valley
  • paleoelevation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Slow Cenozoic uplift of the western Andean Cordillera indicated by cosmogenic 3He in alluvial boulders from the Pacific Planation Surface. / Evenstar, Laura A.; Stuart, Finlay M.; Hartley, Adrian J.; Tattitch, Brain.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 42, No. 20, 28.10.2015, p. 8448-8455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evenstar, Laura A.; Stuart, Finlay M.; Hartley, Adrian J.; Tattitch, Brain / Slow Cenozoic uplift of the western Andean Cordillera indicated by cosmogenic 3He in alluvial boulders from the Pacific Planation Surface.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 42, No. 20, 28.10.2015, p. 8448-8455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "To determine the mechanisms responsible for mountain belt growth, it is important to accurately establish the timing of surface uplift. Here we exploit the altitude control on the production rate of in situ cosmogenic nuclides to test the hypothesis that the Andes was uplifted in the late Miocene. High concentrations of in situ cosmogenic 3He (3Hecos) have previously been measured in alluvial boulders on the western flank of the Central Andes, northern Chile (Evenstar et al. 2009). These are consistent with deposition soon after formation of the surface (13–14 Ma). We have modeled the accumulation of cosmogenic 3He in several different surface uplift scenarios and compared them to the measured concentrations. The measured 3Hecos concentrations are too high to be produced by late Miocene uplift and imply that the western flank of the Andean Cordillera attained a substantial part of its current elevation prior to 14 Myr ago.",
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