Species-habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest

C. V. S. Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N. Gunatilleke, S. Esufali, K. E. Harms, P. M. S. Ashton, D. F. R. P. Burslem, P. S. Ashton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forest structure and species distribution patterns were examined among eight topographically defined habitats for the 205 species with stems >= 1 cm dbh inhabiting a 25-ha plot in the Sinharaja rain forest, Sri Lanka. The habitats were steep spurs, less-steep spurs, steep gullies and less-steep gullies, all at either lower or upper elevations. Mean stem density was significantly greater on the upper spurs than in the lower, less-steep gullies. Stem density was also higher on spurs than in gullies within each elevation category and in each upper-elevation habitat than in its corresponding lower-elevation habitat. Basal area varied less among habitats, but followed similar trends to stem density. Species richness and Fisher's alpha were lower in the upper-elevation habitats than in the lower-elevation habitats. These differences appeared to be related to the abundances of the dominant species. Of the 125 species subjected to torus-translation tests, 99 species (abundant and less abundant and those in different strata) showed at least one positive or negative association to one or more of the habitats. Species associations were relatively more frequent with the lower-elevation gullies. These and the previous findings on seedling ecophysiology, morphology and anatomy of sonic of the habitat specialists suggest that edaphic and hydrological variation related to topography, accompanied by canopy disturbances of varying intensity, type and extent along the catenal landscape, plays a major role in habitat partitioning in this forest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-384
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Tropical Ecology
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • environmental heterogeneity
  • habitat specialization
  • rain forest
  • Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot
  • species-habitat associations
  • Sri Lanka
  • torus translations
  • TROPICAL RAIN-FORESTS
  • RECRUITMENT LIMITATION
  • NEOTROPICAL FOREST
  • TREES
  • DIVERSITY
  • SHOREA
  • PLOTS
  • HETEROGENEITY
  • COEXISTENCE
  • TOPOGRAPHY

Cite this

Gunatilleke, C. V. S., Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N., Esufali, S., Harms, K. E., Ashton, P. M. S., Burslem, D. F. R. P., & Ashton, P. S. (2006). Species-habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 22, 371-384. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467406003282

Species-habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest. / Gunatilleke, C. V. S.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.; Esufali, S.; Harms, K. E.; Ashton, P. M. S.; Burslem, D. F. R. P.; Ashton, P. S.

In: Journal of Tropical Ecology, Vol. 22, 2006, p. 371-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gunatilleke, CVS, Gunatilleke, IAUN, Esufali, S, Harms, KE, Ashton, PMS, Burslem, DFRP & Ashton, PS 2006, 'Species-habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest' Journal of Tropical Ecology, vol. 22, pp. 371-384. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467406003282
Gunatilleke, C. V. S. ; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N. ; Esufali, S. ; Harms, K. E. ; Ashton, P. M. S. ; Burslem, D. F. R. P. ; Ashton, P. S. / Species-habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest. In: Journal of Tropical Ecology. 2006 ; Vol. 22. pp. 371-384.
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abstract = "Forest structure and species distribution patterns were examined among eight topographically defined habitats for the 205 species with stems >= 1 cm dbh inhabiting a 25-ha plot in the Sinharaja rain forest, Sri Lanka. The habitats were steep spurs, less-steep spurs, steep gullies and less-steep gullies, all at either lower or upper elevations. Mean stem density was significantly greater on the upper spurs than in the lower, less-steep gullies. Stem density was also higher on spurs than in gullies within each elevation category and in each upper-elevation habitat than in its corresponding lower-elevation habitat. Basal area varied less among habitats, but followed similar trends to stem density. Species richness and Fisher's alpha were lower in the upper-elevation habitats than in the lower-elevation habitats. These differences appeared to be related to the abundances of the dominant species. Of the 125 species subjected to torus-translation tests, 99 species (abundant and less abundant and those in different strata) showed at least one positive or negative association to one or more of the habitats. Species associations were relatively more frequent with the lower-elevation gullies. These and the previous findings on seedling ecophysiology, morphology and anatomy of sonic of the habitat specialists suggest that edaphic and hydrological variation related to topography, accompanied by canopy disturbances of varying intensity, type and extent along the catenal landscape, plays a major role in habitat partitioning in this forest.",
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AU - Gunatilleke, C. V. S.

AU - Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.

AU - Esufali, S.

AU - Harms, K. E.

AU - Ashton, P. M. S.

AU - Burslem, D. F. R. P.

AU - Ashton, P. S.

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N2 - Forest structure and species distribution patterns were examined among eight topographically defined habitats for the 205 species with stems >= 1 cm dbh inhabiting a 25-ha plot in the Sinharaja rain forest, Sri Lanka. The habitats were steep spurs, less-steep spurs, steep gullies and less-steep gullies, all at either lower or upper elevations. Mean stem density was significantly greater on the upper spurs than in the lower, less-steep gullies. Stem density was also higher on spurs than in gullies within each elevation category and in each upper-elevation habitat than in its corresponding lower-elevation habitat. Basal area varied less among habitats, but followed similar trends to stem density. Species richness and Fisher's alpha were lower in the upper-elevation habitats than in the lower-elevation habitats. These differences appeared to be related to the abundances of the dominant species. Of the 125 species subjected to torus-translation tests, 99 species (abundant and less abundant and those in different strata) showed at least one positive or negative association to one or more of the habitats. Species associations were relatively more frequent with the lower-elevation gullies. These and the previous findings on seedling ecophysiology, morphology and anatomy of sonic of the habitat specialists suggest that edaphic and hydrological variation related to topography, accompanied by canopy disturbances of varying intensity, type and extent along the catenal landscape, plays a major role in habitat partitioning in this forest.

AB - Forest structure and species distribution patterns were examined among eight topographically defined habitats for the 205 species with stems >= 1 cm dbh inhabiting a 25-ha plot in the Sinharaja rain forest, Sri Lanka. The habitats were steep spurs, less-steep spurs, steep gullies and less-steep gullies, all at either lower or upper elevations. Mean stem density was significantly greater on the upper spurs than in the lower, less-steep gullies. Stem density was also higher on spurs than in gullies within each elevation category and in each upper-elevation habitat than in its corresponding lower-elevation habitat. Basal area varied less among habitats, but followed similar trends to stem density. Species richness and Fisher's alpha were lower in the upper-elevation habitats than in the lower-elevation habitats. These differences appeared to be related to the abundances of the dominant species. Of the 125 species subjected to torus-translation tests, 99 species (abundant and less abundant and those in different strata) showed at least one positive or negative association to one or more of the habitats. Species associations were relatively more frequent with the lower-elevation gullies. These and the previous findings on seedling ecophysiology, morphology and anatomy of sonic of the habitat specialists suggest that edaphic and hydrological variation related to topography, accompanied by canopy disturbances of varying intensity, type and extent along the catenal landscape, plays a major role in habitat partitioning in this forest.

KW - environmental heterogeneity

KW - habitat specialization

KW - rain forest

KW - Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot

KW - species-habitat associations

KW - Sri Lanka

KW - torus translations

KW - TROPICAL RAIN-FORESTS

KW - RECRUITMENT LIMITATION

KW - NEOTROPICAL FOREST

KW - TREES

KW - DIVERSITY

KW - SHOREA

KW - PLOTS

KW - HETEROGENEITY

KW - COEXISTENCE

KW - TOPOGRAPHY

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DO - 10.1017/S0266467406003282

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 371

EP - 384

JO - Journal of Tropical Ecology

JF - Journal of Tropical Ecology

SN - 0266-4674

ER -