Steady-state visual evoked potentials elicited from early visual cortex reflect both perceptual color space and cone-opponent mechanisms

Sae Kaneko* (Corresponding Author), Ichiro Kuriki, Søren K. Andersen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Colors are represented in the cone-opponent signals, L-M vs S cones, at least up to the level of inputs to the primary visual cortex. We explored the hue selective responses in early cortical visual areas through recordings of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), elicited by a flickering checkerboard whose color smoothly swept around the hue circle defined in a cone-opponent color space. If cone-opponency dominates hue representation in the source of SSVEP signals, SSVEP amplitudes as a function of hue should form a profile that is line-symmetric along the cardinal axes of the cone-opponent color space. Observed SSVEP responses were clearly chromatic ones with increased SSVEP amplitudes and reduced response latencies for higher contrast conditions. The overall elliptic amplitude profile was significantly tilted away from the cardinal axes to have the highest amplitudes in the “lime-magenta” direction, indicating that the hue representation in question is not dominated by cone-opponency. The observed SSVEP amplitude hue profile was better described as a summation of a perceptual response and cone-opponent responses with a larger weight to the former. These results indicate that hue representations in the early visual cortex, measured by the SSVEP technique, are possibly related to perceptual color contrast.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCerebral Cortex Communications
Early online date1 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • color representation
  • EEG
  • intermediate hues
  • isoluminant colors
  • primary visual cortex

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